Tag Archives: chicanos por la causa

Clarence McAllister, president and CEO of Fortis Networks,

Arizona’s 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders

What would you do it you opened the pages of this magazine and saw Jerry Colangelo listed as one of the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona? You’d do a double take, but it’s not out of the realm of possibilities.

Consider this: Among 439,633 Arizonans under age 5 in 2012, this is how the Census broke down those numbers:

• Hispanic: 196,776 (44.8 percent)
• Non-Hispanic white: 171,888 (39.1 percent)
• American Indian and Alaska Native: 22,198 (5 percent)
• Black: 18,617 (4.2 percent)
• Asian: 11,311 (2.6 percent)
• Two or more races: 18,088 (4.1 percent)
• Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 755 (0.17).

If you combine numbers like that with the fact that 91.7 percent of the nation’s population growth between 2000 and 2010 was attributed to racial and ethnic minorities, with the largest segment of population growth occurring in the Hispanic community, lists like this — the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona of 2014 — could become obsolete in our lifetimes.

Until we get there and as our state’s minority population moves toward majority status, it’s important to notice that the state’s most dynmanic business leaders have helped fuel our economic recovery and growth … and many of them just happen to be minorities. And while the future looks bright, we still have work to in overcoming outdated perceptions. According to a 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Report commissioned by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a significant portion of minority-owned businesses in Arizona have had problems earning the trust of their customers, suppliers, peers and lenders and need support from within the business community to help break down some of these misconceptions and stigma.

The 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona, whom you will meet below, have changed that perception.

Benito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Heritage: Mexican-American
A graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara, Almanza has been with Bank of America for 34 years. He is a member of the Teach for America Arizona Board.
His hope for professional legacy: “Working every day with great teammates to make our community better and surrounding myself with strong leaders and developing them to replace me.”

Glynis Bryan
CFO
Insight Enterprises Inc.
Heritage: Jamaican
Bryan is responsible for setting the company’s financial strategies; ensuring the company has the appropriate financial and operating controls and systems in place to support future growth; and serving as a financial and business advisor to the leadership team.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Setting a standard of excellence in an organization and helping teammates reach their full potential.”

Debbie Cotton
Director
Phoenix Convention Center
Heritage: African American
Cotton manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Throughout my career, I’d like to be remembered for adhering to high ethical standards and inspiring individuals to pursue careers within public service.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Heritage: Peruvian and Mexican
De la Melena, who directs the state’s leading advocate representing more than 60,000 Hispanic business enterprises, has 20 years of global brand management, business development and Latino marketing experience gained from conducting business in more than 30 countries.
His hope for professional legacy: “For helping the lifeblood of our economy, small businesses, prosper – especially minority-owned businesses, now one-fourth of Arizona’s total. Our future global competitiveness depends on it.”

Diane Enos
President
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
Enos is the 23rd president of the Salt River Community and the second women elected to the office. Enos is the first member of the Community to become a lawyer and practiced in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office for 11 years.
Heritage: Onk Akimel O’Odham, or one of the River People otherwise known as Pima
Her hope for professional legacy: “The top qualities I’d like to be remembered for is someone who was unafraid to try something new and to do it with integrity for the good of my people.”

Rufus Glasper
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges
Heritage: African American
As the CEO of one of the nation’s largest systems of community colleges, he is leading MCCCD to address the community’s education and workforce training needs.
His hope for professional legacy: “An educator who focused on human rights and education for first-generation college students, quality healthcare, workforce and jobs, and re-framing an institution for the future.”

Deborah Griffin
President of the board of directors
Gila River Casinos
Heritage: Gila River Indian Community member and Mexican-American
Griffin leads Arizona’s largest minority-run business with more that 2,500 employees.
Her hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered for creating a legacy of self-sufficiency and volunteerism in my community. My Tribe needs only to seek within themselves and have confidence in the beauty of their abilities to continue this legacy.”

Edmundo Hidalgo
President and CEO
Chicanos Por La Causa
Heritage: Mexican-American
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the community. The Hispanic community is at a breakaway point because of our demographics and the opportunities we establish for our youth will have a tremendous impact on our state. As the Hispanic community goes, so will the State of Arizona. My focus has always been in support of education and ensuring that young people get the opportunities I received as I was beginning my career. I am blessed to have been mentored by many individuals who were willing to invest in me and I have the responsibility to do the same.”

Leezie Kim
Partner
Quarles & Brady
Heritage: Korean-American
Kim returned to Quarles & Brady after four years of service as a White House appointee to the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano.
Her hope for professional legacy: “As a trusted counselor to and partner with leaders in business, government and politics who found new ways to get things done that make life a little better for us all.”

David Kong
President and CEO
Best Western International
Since he was named president and CEO in 2004, Kong has guided Best Western International through a brand resurgence, winning numerous awards for training, social media and ecommerce initiatives. Brand Keys ranked Best Western No. 1 in customer loyalty for four consecutive years.
Heritage: Asian
His hope for professional legacy: “I’d like to be remembered for having made a positive difference – in Best Western, in the industry and the lives of all our associates and our hotel staff.”

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”

Steve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias serves on the Governor’s Council on Small Business and is co-chair of the Supply Chain/Buy Arizona Committee, which is exploring ways government can help promote Arizona businesses.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “Someone who made a positive impact in promoting manufacturing as a worthwhile and valuable industry that provides quality jobs to the community.”

Louis J. Manuel, Jr.
Chairman
Ak-Chin Indian Community
Heritage: Tohono O’odham Nation and Ak-Chin Indian Community
Manuel has diversified his Community’s economy with Ak-Chin Farms, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, Santa Cruz Commerce Center and a partnership with the Super Bowl Host Committee.
His hope for professional legacy: “That my decision making gave value and sustainability in promoting a strong future and self-reliance for the people I serve.”

Clarence McAllister
President and CEO
Fortis Networks
Heritage: Black Latino
McAllister was born in Panama and earned degrees in electrical engineering from ASU and an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. In 2000, he and his wife Reyna started Fortis, a certified 8a and HUBZone government contractor specialized in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an immigrant who came to this country in search of the American Dream, and built a business that employs more than 100 Americans.”

Alfredo Molina
Chairman
Molina Jewelers
Heritage: Hispanic
Molina went from fleeing Cuba as a boy without a change of clothes to rocking the jewelry world by selling the Archduke Joseph diamond for $21.5 million, the most ever paid at auction for a colorless diamond.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference. I believe that every individual is a precious jewel and it is my commitment and social responsibility to ensure they become brilliant.”

Rodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
Heritage: Mexican
Parga has been named in multiple editions of Southwest Super Lawyers®, including in 2014. He also serves on the doard of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading nonprofit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as always trying my best to do the right thing, and being fair and loyal.”

Dan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Heritage: Hispanic
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck and has built it into the largest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an individual who created a company that set industry standards, gave back to an industry generous with opportunity and helped people grow personally and professionally.”

Terry Rambler
Chairman
Arizona Indian Gaming Association
Heritage: San Carlos Apache Tribe
In addition to his AIGA leadership role, Rambler is chariman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe and president of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “Strong vision, consistent oversight, yet humble leadership that helped build successful partnerships in economic development, cultural preservation, and the expansion of tribal sovereignty.”

Terence Roberts, M.D., J.D.
Radiation oncologist
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center
Heritage: African-American
Roberts specializes in stereotactic radiosurgery and tumors of the brain, spine, and prostate. He also received a law degree from Stanford University and practiced corporate law in the Silicon Valley for start-up companies.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered professionally as compassionate, knowledgeable and having integrity. Also as someone who innovated in an era of health care reform.”

Steve Sanghi
Chairman, CEO and president
Microchip Technology
Heritage: Indian
Sanghi, named president of Microchip in 1990, CEO in 1991 and chairman in 1993, is the author of “Driving Excellence: How The Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader.”
His hope for professional legacy: “For building Microchip Technology into one of the most successful semiconductor companies, which achieved an unprecedented 100 consecutive profitable quarters in a brutally competitive industry.”

Roxanne K. Song Ong
Chief presiding judge
Phoenix Municipal Court
Heritage: Chinese American
Song Ong, who chair the Arizona Supreme Court Commission on Minorities, was the first Asian female judge in Arizona and first minority to be named as Phoenix chief judge.
Her hope for professional legacy: “It would be my great honor to be remembered for three primary things: (1) my work in judicial and civics education, (2) the promotion of cultural competency and diversity in the judicial and legal profession, and (3) promoting access to justice for all Arizonans through legal services and education.”

Charlie Touché
Chairman and CEO
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
In 2004, Touché became chairman and CEO of one of the largest insurance agencies in the United States, with nearly 200 employees in three offices and more than $300 million in total premiums.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “I’m proud to say that during this entire century, we’ve remained a client-driven, hands-on kind of company with people who will roll up their sleeves and jump in the trenches to help those we do business with.”

Lisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
Heritage: Mexican
Urias has built an award-winning advertising, marketing and public relations agency that specializes in the diverse markets of the American Southwest, particularly the Hispanic market.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Having a nationally-known agency that successfully connects corporations to multicultural markets through ad campaigns, public relations and community outreach for mutual benefit and respect.”

Lonnie J. Williams, Jr.
Partner
Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Heritage: Black
The Yale graduate’s practice focuses on commercial business and employment-related matters. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in America.
His hope for professional legacy: “Martin Luther King said, ‘if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.’ Professionally, I would like to be remembered like that street sweeper.”

Kuldip Verma
CEO
Vermaland
Heritage: East Indian
Vermaland, founded by Verma, holds more than 24,000 acres of land in Arizona with a portfolio valued at $500 million. Nabha, the tiny Indian village Verma was born in, could fit many times into the acreage he now controls in the desert Southwest.
His hope for professional legacy: “I saw a dream and pursued it. Success without humility is a curse, but Success with your values intact is a blessing.”

Entrepreneurs

$100K Micro-lending Fund Supports Entrepreneurs

CPLC Préstamos CDFI, LLC (a Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. subsidiary), committed to building stronger communities by providing small business access to capital, in partnership with local valley leaders, have created the Community Investment Fund – a group project of Valley Leadership’s Class 35, to support entrepreneurs looking to start-up or expand their business in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

“We are very excited to give local entrepreneurs, who do not qualify for traditional financing, an opportunity to improve the health of our community and contribute to Arizona’s economy,” said Brigitte Dayton, Member of VL 35. “Our Valley Leadership, Class 35 group is proud to partner with a long-standing community organization such as Chicanos Por La Causa on this project. We all feel the emphasis on targeting organizations or individuals who demonstrate a focus on improving the health of our community and/or contributing to the growth of the economy, through the potential for job creation, fills a unique role in local micro-lending.”

“Any current or aspiring entrepreneur who wishes to establish or grow a business, but who due to size, assets, and stage of development cannot seek capital from more traditional sources, is encouraged to apply for a loan today,” said Jose Martinez, President of CPLC Préstamos. “These loans range from $20,000 to $25,000 depending on the applicant, business plan and distinctiveness of the entrepreneurial idea.”

Top qualified applicants will compete in a business “Pitch Day” event where they will have the opportunity to pitch their business concept and funding needs to a panel on May 23, 2014. The panel will select 3-5 businesses for loan approval. Additionally, the business with the best presentation will win a $2,500 cash prize.

Interested candidates can apply at www.prestamosloans.org up until Friday, April 25, 2014. Applicants will be notified of loan approval the same day of their presentation, May 23, 2014.

Leonardo Loo

Loo Earns Community Leader of the Year Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leonardo Loo, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, received the Community Leader of the Year Award from the Phoenix chapter of the National Association of Asian American Professionals.

Loo received the award for his devotion to the community and outstanding service to the valley. The award was presented to him at the organization’s annual dinner event on January 11.

Loo is a member of the firm’s Corporate Services and China Law practice groups. He practices in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, commercial financing, international transactions, securities and general corporate law involving clients in a wide variety of industries. He is also a member of the boards of directors of several organizations, including the Arizona Asian American Bar Association, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. and Greater Phoenix Black Chamber of Commerce, and he also serves as general counsel for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Loo earned his law degree from the University Chicago and his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.

hispanic

Chase Spurs Small Businesses, Affordable Housing

The JPMorgan Chase Foundation (NYSE: JPM) announced a $6 million grant to NALCAB—National Association for Latino Community Asset Builders—for a multi-market pilot project focused on job creation, affordable housing, and small business lending in predominantly Latino communities. The three-year initiative is being led by NALCAB, as the lead applicant and convener for the project. Partners in the initiative include three nonprofit lenders working in five states:

* Affordable Homes of South Texas, Inc. (AHSTI)—Texas
* Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC)—Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada
* Community Resources and Housing Development Corporation (CRHDC)—Colorado

In its first year, the initiative will have an immediate impact on low and moderate income Latino communities still recovering from the recession. The nonprofit lenders will finance affordable housing and small businesses. In subsequent years, the partners will continue to leverage and expand their capital for lending and establish an equity fund.

This project builds on NALCAB’s successful track record in connection with two major national initiatives, the NSP2 (Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2) National Consortium and Inversiones: A Small Business Investment Initiative, which has been recognized by the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) as a Commitment to America. Under NSP2, a consortium of nonprofit affordable housing providers, including AHSTI, CPLC, and CRHDC, was awarded $137 million in federal funding to stabilize housing in neighborhoods hit by the foreclosure crisis. The consortium has produced more than 1,600 housing units and created 2,300 jobs. CGI/Inversiones is utilizing NALCAB’s national network of nonprofits to leverage $70 million to create 4,000 jobs by supporting the start up or expansion of 1,500 small businesses in predominantly Latino communities.

As the lead applicant, convener and catalyst, NALCAB will be providing subgrants, technical assistance and training support to the three partners. “With this grant, JPMorgan Chase is making a bold investment in ongoing economic recovery in Latino communities that were hard to hit in the recession,” stated Noel Poyo, Executive Director at NALCAB. “The NALCAB Network will use this funding to drive innovative approaches to affordable housing production and small business lending—ultimately creating jobs and economic opportunity in low-income communities.”

“JPMorgan Chase views community development financial institutions as critical change-agents in underserved communities,” said Morris Camp, President of Chase in San Antonio. “Our $33 million commitment – made through our new CDFI Collaboratives program – will help our partners serve more people in need, as well as catalyze investment in low- and middle-income communities across Texas and the US.”

AHSTI, CPLC and CRHDC, all members of the NALCAB network, are high-capacity anchor institutions in their communities that provide culturally and linguistically relevant services. They are certified by the U.S. Department of the Treasury as Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI), nonprofit financial institutions that serve low-income communities. The CDFI designation provides opportunities for these organizations to access technical and financial support.

140007839

BCBSAZ, CPLC educate Arizonans about healthcare reform

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) and Chicanos Por la Causa, Inc. (CPLC) announced a joint effort  to help educate Arizonans about the healthcare reform law. Together the organizations aim to reach those who likely haven’t had insurance in the past and may not understand how the law will benefit them.

With a combined 117 years in the Valley, BCBSAZ and CPLC have a long history and shared commitment to the community. In the days ahead, the organizations are teaming up to:
· Make bilingual healthcare reform advisors available.
· Host healthcare reform education events.
· Conduct shared media opportunities with Hispanic outlets.
· Identify ongoing education opportunities.

“Working with CPLC, we’ll serve Arizonans in every corner of the state by providing resources and tools needed to make smart decisions in a time when healthcare is changing greatly,” said Richard L. Boals, president and CEO for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona. “The open enrollment period gives Arizonans a chance to research their options and learn more about the value health insurance plays in keeping our communities healthy.”

“As one of Arizona’s largest social services organization, we are always looking for new opportunities to expand our service and support those who are historically underserved. Healthcare is a fundamental need and helping individuals understand how the Affordable Care Act impacts their lives and the best way to get coverage is our goal,” said Edmundo Hidalgo, CPLC President and CEO. Working with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, we have the opportunity not only to educate the community, but assist individuals in getting health insurance through local, personalized service.”

Healthcare reform open enrollment begins October 1 and runs through March 31, 2014. Within Arizona it is estimated that 480,000 people will be eligible for financial assistance. If a person is eligible for a subsidy, they must purchase their health insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, also known as the exchange. Health insurance plans can also be purchased directly through a broker or BCBSAZ.

More healthcare reform information can be found in English at azblue.com or in Spanish at salud.azblue.com. BCBSAZ representatives can be reached at (877) 874-9958.

capital

3 Phoenix-area companies offered access to growth capital

The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), Bank of America, FORTUNE and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) are proud to announce that they have selected three Phoenix-area companies for their annual Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) program. This year the program received a record-setting 5,200 company nominations from across the country and selected 178 companies for participation. Especially critical in today’s economic climate, ICCC identifies inner city businesses in need of growth capital, educates them on the sources of capital, and matches them with capital providers in order to grow their businesses and create jobs.

The three Phoenix-area companies selected include:

Each of these companies was selected for the program because of its strong growth potential and commitment to the inner city.

ICCC, co-founded with Bank of America, educates inner city entrepreneurs on how to access capital and matches them with capital providers. To do this, the program offers selected companies web-based training workshops, coaches to help perfect company pitches, a day-long information session on equity and other forms of growth financing, and an innovative one-day event that directly connects them with investors to make pitches and discuss potential opportunities.

“There is a lack of capital availability in America’s inner cities,” stated Mary Kay Leonard, ICIC President and CEO. “In fact, 71 percent of inner city businesses have, on average, only a quarter of the capital needed to compete on average in their industries. For many urban entrepreneurs, ICCC helps open the door to a network of financial options that they had limited or no access to previously.”

The program is free to the inner city businesses, and 178 companies from across the country have been selected to participate in this year’s program. To qualify, a business must be located in the inner city (defined as an area of concentrated economic distress) or have a disproportionate percent of its employees residing in such an area. In addition, a company must have $2 million in revenue. The companies selected for the program represent numerous industries including technology, food and beverage, consumer goods, business and professional services, and manufacturing.

Since its inception in 2005, 375 inner city companies and 150 capital providers have participated in ICCC. Participating companies have raised more than $703 million in capital and created more than 5,694 jobs in their communities.

“ICCC demonstrates that growing inner companies, if given the access to capital, can generate the jobs and wealth that are crucial to the transformation of our urban communities,” explained Edward Powers, Managing Director of Bank of America BAML Capital Access Fund. “We are proud to help these growing businesses connect with a vast network of capital providers.”

The meetings with potential investors will be held on November 9, 2012 at the headquarters of FORTUNE.

running

Phoenix AIDS Walk and 5K raises $327K

More than 6,000 participants walked, ran and strolled with their dogs in downtown Phoenix on Oct. 21 to raise $327,379 for 19 Valley-based HIV/AIDS service providers.  Since 2007, AIDS Walk Phoenix & 5K Run has raised more than $1.6 million, which has been evenly distributed by Aunt Rita’s Foundation, the 501(c)3 nonprofit agency that organizes the event.

“We had more walkers and runners this year than ever before and though we didn’t hit our goal of $500,000, we still raised a significant amount of money that will be put to good use by the agencies Aunt Rita’s Foundation supports,” said Aunt Rita’s Executive Director Kit Kloeckl.  “I’d say that raising nearly $330,000 in a very tough economy makes this event a significant success.”

Walgreen’s was the title sponsor.  Other sponsors were:

• Presenting Sponsors: Sonora Quest Laboratories, Univision Arizona, 100.3FM La Kalle, Echo Magazine

• Platinum Sponsors: After Hours Multicultural, City of Phoenix, PMT Ambulance, Platinum: After Hours Multicultural, City of Phoenix, PMT Ambulance, Southwest Airlines, Carefree Resort & Conference Center and Safeway; Gold: Attentive Home Health, just Wink, ONE Community, SWAY Events, Phoenix Pride, Rainbows Festival, Cardenas Marketing and Catch Creative; Silver: Avella, ASU Wellness, Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona*, Scottsdale Healthcare’s FitCity Scottsdale, The State Press, WDP Entertainment, Lodestone Systems, Pride Guide Arizona, Arizona Lottery, Bud Light, and Cultural Sponge

Agencies that benefit from the event are: A New Leaf, The Bill Holt Clinic at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Chicanos Por La Causa, Compassion in Action, Concilio Latino de Salud, Ebony House, Heal International, HIV/AIDS Law Project, HIV Care Directions, Joshua Tree Feeding Program, Inc., Maricopa Interfaith HIV/AIDS Alliance, McDowell Healthcare Center, Native American Health, One n Ten, The Phoenix Shanti Group, Project Hardhat, Southwest Behavioral Health Services, Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS, and Terros

In addition to AIDS Walk Phoenix & 5 Run, Aunt Rita’s signature events include SAVORlife, a month-long event during which individuals across the Valley host dinners for their friends, either at home, at restaurants or even at workplaces.  SAVORlife takes place in March.

For more information about Aunt Rita’s, go to www.auntritas.org.  For more information about SAVORlife and to register as a host, visit www.savorlifephoenix.org or call (602) 882-8675.

Dress for Success, Phoenix

Dress For Success Phoenix Aims To Break The Cycle Of Poverty

With an open, vibrant space, the Dress for Success boutique in Phoenix doesn’t look like a typical second-hand clothing store.

And it isn’t.

First launched in 1996, Dress for Success now has 115 affiliates all over the world, providing professional attire to economically disadvantaged women. In addition, Dress for Success continues to work with these women even after they have landed a job.

Founder and Executive Director of the Phoenix affiliation, Lisa Doromal, opened the store in 2009 with hopes of engaging her community, reflecting her stylistic talents and continuing to be a mother to her kids with the flexibility it offers.

“Luckily for me, there was not an affiliate in the Phoenix area,” Doromal says. She filled out an online application, prepared a formal business plan, and said to herself, “I’m going to go for it. This is something that is needed in the community.”

The company receives garment donations from women in the community. However, Doromal says the organization often has to purchase plus-size clothing. Hardly any plus-sized suits are donated, but clients who need them take up about 72 percent of her client base. Still, Doromal insists, “Whether you are a size 0 or 32, we are going to have clothes for an interview.”

Clothes that are deemed inappropriate for clients to wear are picked up weekly by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, a non-profit that benefits the poor.

Funding for purchases comes from a “diverse stream of income sources,” Doromal says. The organization utilizes fundraising opportunities, grants, private donations and agencies that provide supportive services.

Doromal credits her partnership with Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC), an organization aimed at integrating human and economic development, for the success of the boutique. CPLC provided the initial 500-square-foot space for the store. Since then, the boutique has moved to a larger, 3,200-square-foot boutique.

In addition to providing suits, Dress for Success has created several job-readiness programs that extend past the job interview phase.

One of the programs, the Going Places Network, lasts eight weeks. During this time, women meet weekly and “learn how to navigate the Internet network to apply for jobs, presentation skills, mock interviews [and] really honing in on why they are not landing employment,” Doromal adds. Approximately 70 to 80 percent of women are employed by the time the class ends.

Once a woman obtains a job, she can go back to the boutique and get up to a week’s worth of clothing. They also receive an invitation to join the Professional Women’s Group (PWG), which allows women who have gone through the program to interact with one other. PWG covers a range of topics from financial literacy to balancing life and work.

“It’s more than just a suit,” Doromal says. “The suit is just the beginning.”

The boutique is primarily run by volunteers. Through a partnership with the Senior Community Service Employment Program, seniors who have been out of the workforce are given a stipend for their time.

“We treasure our volunteers,” Doromal says.

While Doromal does not anticipate any more locations will open up in the Phoenix area, she does have high hopes for her boutique.

“As long as the client wants to be involved with Dress for Success, we are there for her throughout her professional development,” she says. “[We are] trying to break the cycle of poverty.”

For more information about Dress for Success, visit dressforsuccess.org.

Dress for Success
1024 E. Buckeye Rd., #165
(602) 489-7397
W. P. Carey School

W. P. Carey School Earns Award For Children’s Charity Work

People don’t always associate the business world with charity. However, students at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University are taught to understand that charity work is vital to your real, genuine success in life. This week, the nonprofit Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC) Parenting Arizona is honoring the school for its extensive work on behalf of the children’s charity.

“We’ve had a never-ending stream of generosity from the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says Julie Rosen, executive director of CPLC Parenting Arizona, a statewide program that works to ensure a positive and safe environment for all children. “Not only have students, faculty and staff provided monetary gifts and special events for the families we help, but professors and students have also done pro bono work, providing valuable business advice to help our organization touch more lives.”

W. P. Carey MBA students have adopted CPLC Parenting Arizona as a primary charity. The group is aimed at preventing child abuse and neglect by providing statewide multi-cultural family support services.

Associate Professor Dan Brooks’ class of consulting scholars recently revamped CPLC Parenting Arizona’s website, so the nonprofit can now offer services like parenting classes online to its many recipient families who live in remote areas of Arizona, including Native American reservations. Professor James Ward’s marketing class did a complete, free analysis of CPLC Parenting Arizona’s donor relations strategy. Rosen says the nonprofit received so much good information, it will take a year to finish implementing everything.

“They have shown us how to make our outreach much more positive and targeted,” says Rosen. “We could never afford to pay for the advice and assistance provided by the W. P. Carey School of Business. They just offer amazing access to business experts and caring students.”

For the last couple of years, the school has thrown a December holiday party for families receiving assistance from CPLC Parenting Arizona. Gifts were provided to dozens of children. Last year, students and staff also threw a Halloween party, complete with trick-or-treating stations and cookie decorating. School representatives and students have also held spring cleanup events to paint and spruce up the charity’s offices. Even the winning team from a recent softball event held by the school donated about $2,000 in prize money to the nonprofit.

“Our students, faculty and staff members are always coming up with ways to support CPLC Parenting Arizona because it represents such a great cause,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “They emphasize healthy parenting and provide services to families at risk for violence toward children. We have the shared goal of improving young people’s lives.”

CPLC Parenting Arizona is part of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc., one of the largest nonprofit organizations in Arizona and one of the largest Latino community development organizations in the country. Its chief operating officer, Martin Quintana, is an active board member of several community organizations and a W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame member, who graduated from the school’s nationally recognized executive MBA program. Several other top representatives at Chicanos Por La Causa have also been through the school’s executive MBA program, and the school is actively involved in helping to cultivate new board members to ensure the nonprofit’s success.

The W. P. Carey School of Business will be honored at CPLC Parenting Arizona’s “Champions for Children” Luncheon on Friday, March 16 at the Arizona Biltmore Resort’s Grand Ballroom in Phoenix. The other honorees at this year’s event will be Bank of America, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery and former Arizona Diamondbacks baseball player Luis Gonzalez.

wpcarey.asu.edu

Rodolfo “Rudy” Parga Jr. was named chairman of the Board of Directors of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc.

Parga Named Chairman of the Board for Chicanos Por La Causa

Rodolfo “Rudy” Parga Jr. was named chairman of the Board of Directors of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. Parga, a managing shareholder at Ryley Carlock & Applewhite, had previously served as vice chair of the organization.

“Rudy has been one of the driving forces behind successful initiatives that have helped Chicanos Por La Causa become Arizona’s leading community development corporation,” said CPLC president and CEO Edmundo Hidalgo. “It is a privilege to have the opportunity to work together. We anticipate only great things under Rudy’s leadership.”

Said Parga: “I am humbled and honored to serve in this capacity for an organization that does so much good in the community, the state and the nation. CPLC is a benchmark, culturally proficient organization whose unifying voice and advocacy builds alliances, bridges borders and empowers communities.

“At a time when things can seem divisive, CPLC goes about doing great things and making our world a bit better, and bringing people together. I have been privileged to be involved for several years with this dedicated group of diverse individuals, and the growth and strength of their reach is an incredible success story.”

CPLC is a statewide community development corporation, committed to building stronger, healthier communities as a lead advocate, coalition builder and direct service provider.