Tag Archives: chicanos por la causa

Entrepreneurs

$100K Micro-lending Fund Supports Entrepreneurs

CPLC Préstamos CDFI, LLC (a Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. subsidiary), committed to building stronger communities by providing small business access to capital, in partnership with local valley leaders, have created the Community Investment Fund – a group project of Valley Leadership’s Class 35, to support entrepreneurs looking to start-up or expand their business in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

“We are very excited to give local entrepreneurs, who do not qualify for traditional financing, an opportunity to improve the health of our community and contribute to Arizona’s economy,” said Brigitte Dayton, Member of VL 35. “Our Valley Leadership, Class 35 group is proud to partner with a long-standing community organization such as Chicanos Por La Causa on this project. We all feel the emphasis on targeting organizations or individuals who demonstrate a focus on improving the health of our community and/or contributing to the growth of the economy, through the potential for job creation, fills a unique role in local micro-lending.”

“Any current or aspiring entrepreneur who wishes to establish or grow a business, but who due to size, assets, and stage of development cannot seek capital from more traditional sources, is encouraged to apply for a loan today,” said Jose Martinez, President of CPLC Préstamos. “These loans range from $20,000 to $25,000 depending on the applicant, business plan and distinctiveness of the entrepreneurial idea.”

Top qualified applicants will compete in a business “Pitch Day” event where they will have the opportunity to pitch their business concept and funding needs to a panel on May 23, 2014. The panel will select 3-5 businesses for loan approval. Additionally, the business with the best presentation will win a $2,500 cash prize.

Interested candidates can apply at www.prestamosloans.org up until Friday, April 25, 2014. Applicants will be notified of loan approval the same day of their presentation, May 23, 2014.

Leonardo Loo

Loo Earns Community Leader of the Year Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leonardo Loo, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, received the Community Leader of the Year Award from the Phoenix chapter of the National Association of Asian American Professionals.

Loo received the award for his devotion to the community and outstanding service to the valley. The award was presented to him at the organization’s annual dinner event on January 11.

Loo is a member of the firm’s Corporate Services and China Law practice groups. He practices in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, commercial financing, international transactions, securities and general corporate law involving clients in a wide variety of industries. He is also a member of the boards of directors of several organizations, including the Arizona Asian American Bar Association, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. and Greater Phoenix Black Chamber of Commerce, and he also serves as general counsel for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Loo earned his law degree from the University Chicago and his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.

hispanic

Chase Spurs Small Businesses, Affordable Housing

The JPMorgan Chase Foundation (NYSE: JPM) announced a $6 million grant to NALCAB—National Association for Latino Community Asset Builders—for a multi-market pilot project focused on job creation, affordable housing, and small business lending in predominantly Latino communities. The three-year initiative is being led by NALCAB, as the lead applicant and convener for the project. Partners in the initiative include three nonprofit lenders working in five states:

* Affordable Homes of South Texas, Inc. (AHSTI)—Texas
* Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC)—Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada
* Community Resources and Housing Development Corporation (CRHDC)—Colorado

In its first year, the initiative will have an immediate impact on low and moderate income Latino communities still recovering from the recession. The nonprofit lenders will finance affordable housing and small businesses. In subsequent years, the partners will continue to leverage and expand their capital for lending and establish an equity fund.

This project builds on NALCAB’s successful track record in connection with two major national initiatives, the NSP2 (Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2) National Consortium and Inversiones: A Small Business Investment Initiative, which has been recognized by the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) as a Commitment to America. Under NSP2, a consortium of nonprofit affordable housing providers, including AHSTI, CPLC, and CRHDC, was awarded $137 million in federal funding to stabilize housing in neighborhoods hit by the foreclosure crisis. The consortium has produced more than 1,600 housing units and created 2,300 jobs. CGI/Inversiones is utilizing NALCAB’s national network of nonprofits to leverage $70 million to create 4,000 jobs by supporting the start up or expansion of 1,500 small businesses in predominantly Latino communities.

As the lead applicant, convener and catalyst, NALCAB will be providing subgrants, technical assistance and training support to the three partners. “With this grant, JPMorgan Chase is making a bold investment in ongoing economic recovery in Latino communities that were hard to hit in the recession,” stated Noel Poyo, Executive Director at NALCAB. “The NALCAB Network will use this funding to drive innovative approaches to affordable housing production and small business lending—ultimately creating jobs and economic opportunity in low-income communities.”

“JPMorgan Chase views community development financial institutions as critical change-agents in underserved communities,” said Morris Camp, President of Chase in San Antonio. “Our $33 million commitment – made through our new CDFI Collaboratives program – will help our partners serve more people in need, as well as catalyze investment in low- and middle-income communities across Texas and the US.”

AHSTI, CPLC and CRHDC, all members of the NALCAB network, are high-capacity anchor institutions in their communities that provide culturally and linguistically relevant services. They are certified by the U.S. Department of the Treasury as Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI), nonprofit financial institutions that serve low-income communities. The CDFI designation provides opportunities for these organizations to access technical and financial support.

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BCBSAZ, CPLC educate Arizonans about healthcare reform

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) and Chicanos Por la Causa, Inc. (CPLC) announced a joint effort  to help educate Arizonans about the healthcare reform law. Together the organizations aim to reach those who likely haven’t had insurance in the past and may not understand how the law will benefit them.

With a combined 117 years in the Valley, BCBSAZ and CPLC have a long history and shared commitment to the community. In the days ahead, the organizations are teaming up to:
· Make bilingual healthcare reform advisors available.
· Host healthcare reform education events.
· Conduct shared media opportunities with Hispanic outlets.
· Identify ongoing education opportunities.

“Working with CPLC, we’ll serve Arizonans in every corner of the state by providing resources and tools needed to make smart decisions in a time when healthcare is changing greatly,” said Richard L. Boals, president and CEO for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona. “The open enrollment period gives Arizonans a chance to research their options and learn more about the value health insurance plays in keeping our communities healthy.”

“As one of Arizona’s largest social services organization, we are always looking for new opportunities to expand our service and support those who are historically underserved. Healthcare is a fundamental need and helping individuals understand how the Affordable Care Act impacts their lives and the best way to get coverage is our goal,” said Edmundo Hidalgo, CPLC President and CEO. Working with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, we have the opportunity not only to educate the community, but assist individuals in getting health insurance through local, personalized service.”

Healthcare reform open enrollment begins October 1 and runs through March 31, 2014. Within Arizona it is estimated that 480,000 people will be eligible for financial assistance. If a person is eligible for a subsidy, they must purchase their health insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, also known as the exchange. Health insurance plans can also be purchased directly through a broker or BCBSAZ.

More healthcare reform information can be found in English at azblue.com or in Spanish at salud.azblue.com. BCBSAZ representatives can be reached at (877) 874-9958.

capital

3 Phoenix-area companies offered access to growth capital

The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), Bank of America, FORTUNE and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) are proud to announce that they have selected three Phoenix-area companies for their annual Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) program. This year the program received a record-setting 5,200 company nominations from across the country and selected 178 companies for participation. Especially critical in today’s economic climate, ICCC identifies inner city businesses in need of growth capital, educates them on the sources of capital, and matches them with capital providers in order to grow their businesses and create jobs.

The three Phoenix-area companies selected include:

Each of these companies was selected for the program because of its strong growth potential and commitment to the inner city.

ICCC, co-founded with Bank of America, educates inner city entrepreneurs on how to access capital and matches them with capital providers. To do this, the program offers selected companies web-based training workshops, coaches to help perfect company pitches, a day-long information session on equity and other forms of growth financing, and an innovative one-day event that directly connects them with investors to make pitches and discuss potential opportunities.

“There is a lack of capital availability in America’s inner cities,” stated Mary Kay Leonard, ICIC President and CEO. “In fact, 71 percent of inner city businesses have, on average, only a quarter of the capital needed to compete on average in their industries. For many urban entrepreneurs, ICCC helps open the door to a network of financial options that they had limited or no access to previously.”

The program is free to the inner city businesses, and 178 companies from across the country have been selected to participate in this year’s program. To qualify, a business must be located in the inner city (defined as an area of concentrated economic distress) or have a disproportionate percent of its employees residing in such an area. In addition, a company must have $2 million in revenue. The companies selected for the program represent numerous industries including technology, food and beverage, consumer goods, business and professional services, and manufacturing.

Since its inception in 2005, 375 inner city companies and 150 capital providers have participated in ICCC. Participating companies have raised more than $703 million in capital and created more than 5,694 jobs in their communities.

“ICCC demonstrates that growing inner companies, if given the access to capital, can generate the jobs and wealth that are crucial to the transformation of our urban communities,” explained Edward Powers, Managing Director of Bank of America BAML Capital Access Fund. “We are proud to help these growing businesses connect with a vast network of capital providers.”

The meetings with potential investors will be held on November 9, 2012 at the headquarters of FORTUNE.

running

Phoenix AIDS Walk and 5K raises $327K

More than 6,000 participants walked, ran and strolled with their dogs in downtown Phoenix on Oct. 21 to raise $327,379 for 19 Valley-based HIV/AIDS service providers.  Since 2007, AIDS Walk Phoenix & 5K Run has raised more than $1.6 million, which has been evenly distributed by Aunt Rita’s Foundation, the 501(c)3 nonprofit agency that organizes the event.

“We had more walkers and runners this year than ever before and though we didn’t hit our goal of $500,000, we still raised a significant amount of money that will be put to good use by the agencies Aunt Rita’s Foundation supports,” said Aunt Rita’s Executive Director Kit Kloeckl.  “I’d say that raising nearly $330,000 in a very tough economy makes this event a significant success.”

Walgreen’s was the title sponsor.  Other sponsors were:

• Presenting Sponsors: Sonora Quest Laboratories, Univision Arizona, 100.3FM La Kalle, Echo Magazine

• Platinum Sponsors: After Hours Multicultural, City of Phoenix, PMT Ambulance, Platinum: After Hours Multicultural, City of Phoenix, PMT Ambulance, Southwest Airlines, Carefree Resort & Conference Center and Safeway; Gold: Attentive Home Health, just Wink, ONE Community, SWAY Events, Phoenix Pride, Rainbows Festival, Cardenas Marketing and Catch Creative; Silver: Avella, ASU Wellness, Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona*, Scottsdale Healthcare’s FitCity Scottsdale, The State Press, WDP Entertainment, Lodestone Systems, Pride Guide Arizona, Arizona Lottery, Bud Light, and Cultural Sponge

Agencies that benefit from the event are: A New Leaf, The Bill Holt Clinic at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Chicanos Por La Causa, Compassion in Action, Concilio Latino de Salud, Ebony House, Heal International, HIV/AIDS Law Project, HIV Care Directions, Joshua Tree Feeding Program, Inc., Maricopa Interfaith HIV/AIDS Alliance, McDowell Healthcare Center, Native American Health, One n Ten, The Phoenix Shanti Group, Project Hardhat, Southwest Behavioral Health Services, Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS, and Terros

In addition to AIDS Walk Phoenix & 5 Run, Aunt Rita’s signature events include SAVORlife, a month-long event during which individuals across the Valley host dinners for their friends, either at home, at restaurants or even at workplaces.  SAVORlife takes place in March.

For more information about Aunt Rita’s, go to www.auntritas.org.  For more information about SAVORlife and to register as a host, visit www.savorlifephoenix.org or call (602) 882-8675.

Dress for Success, Phoenix

Dress For Success Phoenix Aims To Break The Cycle Of Poverty

With an open, vibrant space, the Dress for Success boutique in Phoenix doesn’t look like a typical second-hand clothing store.

And it isn’t.

First launched in 1996, Dress for Success now has 115 affiliates all over the world, providing professional attire to economically disadvantaged women. In addition, Dress for Success continues to work with these women even after they have landed a job.

Founder and Executive Director of the Phoenix affiliation, Lisa Doromal, opened the store in 2009 with hopes of engaging her community, reflecting her stylistic talents and continuing to be a mother to her kids with the flexibility it offers.

“Luckily for me, there was not an affiliate in the Phoenix area,” Doromal says. She filled out an online application, prepared a formal business plan, and said to herself, “I’m going to go for it. This is something that is needed in the community.”

The company receives garment donations from women in the community. However, Doromal says the organization often has to purchase plus-size clothing. Hardly any plus-sized suits are donated, but clients who need them take up about 72 percent of her client base. Still, Doromal insists, “Whether you are a size 0 or 32, we are going to have clothes for an interview.”

Clothes that are deemed inappropriate for clients to wear are picked up weekly by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, a non-profit that benefits the poor.

Funding for purchases comes from a “diverse stream of income sources,” Doromal says. The organization utilizes fundraising opportunities, grants, private donations and agencies that provide supportive services.

Doromal credits her partnership with Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC), an organization aimed at integrating human and economic development, for the success of the boutique. CPLC provided the initial 500-square-foot space for the store. Since then, the boutique has moved to a larger, 3,200-square-foot boutique.

In addition to providing suits, Dress for Success has created several job-readiness programs that extend past the job interview phase.

One of the programs, the Going Places Network, lasts eight weeks. During this time, women meet weekly and “learn how to navigate the Internet network to apply for jobs, presentation skills, mock interviews [and] really honing in on why they are not landing employment,” Doromal adds. Approximately 70 to 80 percent of women are employed by the time the class ends.

Once a woman obtains a job, she can go back to the boutique and get up to a week’s worth of clothing. They also receive an invitation to join the Professional Women’s Group (PWG), which allows women who have gone through the program to interact with one other. PWG covers a range of topics from financial literacy to balancing life and work.

“It’s more than just a suit,” Doromal says. “The suit is just the beginning.”

The boutique is primarily run by volunteers. Through a partnership with the Senior Community Service Employment Program, seniors who have been out of the workforce are given a stipend for their time.

“We treasure our volunteers,” Doromal says.

While Doromal does not anticipate any more locations will open up in the Phoenix area, she does have high hopes for her boutique.

“As long as the client wants to be involved with Dress for Success, we are there for her throughout her professional development,” she says. “[We are] trying to break the cycle of poverty.”

For more information about Dress for Success, visit dressforsuccess.org.

Dress for Success
1024 E. Buckeye Rd., #165
(602) 489-7397
W. P. Carey School

W. P. Carey School Earns Award For Children’s Charity Work

People don’t always associate the business world with charity. However, students at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University are taught to understand that charity work is vital to your real, genuine success in life. This week, the nonprofit Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC) Parenting Arizona is honoring the school for its extensive work on behalf of the children’s charity.

“We’ve had a never-ending stream of generosity from the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says Julie Rosen, executive director of CPLC Parenting Arizona, a statewide program that works to ensure a positive and safe environment for all children. “Not only have students, faculty and staff provided monetary gifts and special events for the families we help, but professors and students have also done pro bono work, providing valuable business advice to help our organization touch more lives.”

W. P. Carey MBA students have adopted CPLC Parenting Arizona as a primary charity. The group is aimed at preventing child abuse and neglect by providing statewide multi-cultural family support services.

Associate Professor Dan Brooks’ class of consulting scholars recently revamped CPLC Parenting Arizona’s website, so the nonprofit can now offer services like parenting classes online to its many recipient families who live in remote areas of Arizona, including Native American reservations. Professor James Ward’s marketing class did a complete, free analysis of CPLC Parenting Arizona’s donor relations strategy. Rosen says the nonprofit received so much good information, it will take a year to finish implementing everything.

“They have shown us how to make our outreach much more positive and targeted,” says Rosen. “We could never afford to pay for the advice and assistance provided by the W. P. Carey School of Business. They just offer amazing access to business experts and caring students.”

For the last couple of years, the school has thrown a December holiday party for families receiving assistance from CPLC Parenting Arizona. Gifts were provided to dozens of children. Last year, students and staff also threw a Halloween party, complete with trick-or-treating stations and cookie decorating. School representatives and students have also held spring cleanup events to paint and spruce up the charity’s offices. Even the winning team from a recent softball event held by the school donated about $2,000 in prize money to the nonprofit.

“Our students, faculty and staff members are always coming up with ways to support CPLC Parenting Arizona because it represents such a great cause,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “They emphasize healthy parenting and provide services to families at risk for violence toward children. We have the shared goal of improving young people’s lives.”

CPLC Parenting Arizona is part of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc., one of the largest nonprofit organizations in Arizona and one of the largest Latino community development organizations in the country. Its chief operating officer, Martin Quintana, is an active board member of several community organizations and a W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame member, who graduated from the school’s nationally recognized executive MBA program. Several other top representatives at Chicanos Por La Causa have also been through the school’s executive MBA program, and the school is actively involved in helping to cultivate new board members to ensure the nonprofit’s success.

The W. P. Carey School of Business will be honored at CPLC Parenting Arizona’s “Champions for Children” Luncheon on Friday, March 16 at the Arizona Biltmore Resort’s Grand Ballroom in Phoenix. The other honorees at this year’s event will be Bank of America, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery and former Arizona Diamondbacks baseball player Luis Gonzalez.

wpcarey.asu.edu

Rodolfo “Rudy” Parga Jr. was named chairman of the Board of Directors of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc.

Parga Named Chairman of the Board for Chicanos Por La Causa

Rodolfo “Rudy” Parga Jr. was named chairman of the Board of Directors of Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. Parga, a managing shareholder at Ryley Carlock & Applewhite, had previously served as vice chair of the organization.

“Rudy has been one of the driving forces behind successful initiatives that have helped Chicanos Por La Causa become Arizona’s leading community development corporation,” said CPLC president and CEO Edmundo Hidalgo. “It is a privilege to have the opportunity to work together. We anticipate only great things under Rudy’s leadership.”

Said Parga: “I am humbled and honored to serve in this capacity for an organization that does so much good in the community, the state and the nation. CPLC is a benchmark, culturally proficient organization whose unifying voice and advocacy builds alliances, bridges borders and empowers communities.

“At a time when things can seem divisive, CPLC goes about doing great things and making our world a bit better, and bringing people together. I have been privileged to be involved for several years with this dedicated group of diverse individuals, and the growth and strength of their reach is an incredible success story.”

CPLC is a statewide community development corporation, committed to building stronger, healthier communities as a lead advocate, coalition builder and direct service provider.