Tag Archives: College of Technology and Innovation

engineering

ASU’s engineering schools merge

Arizona State University is merging its two successful engineering schools. The move will enhance and expand engineering education opportunities, lead to growth in the number of engineering and technology graduates, strengthen and increase the impact of research and simplify engagement for industry.

This is a natural next step for ASU’s successful College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) and the Polytechnic campus, where the college is located. Both are now about a decade old.

CTI will be renamed the Polytechnic School, and will be housed within ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. The school will continue to have unique programs, and the engineering and technology programs will be expanded at the Polytechnic campus.

The Arizona Board of Regents approved the change Feb. 5.

“For ASU to pursue its mission of innovative education and research, there needs to be continuous evolution and improvement of the university’s schools and campuses,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “By incorporating the Polytechnic School within Fulton Schools of Engineering, a top 50 nationally ranked engineering school, Poly will attract more students and expand research possibilities faster than could have been done otherwise. The Polytechnic School brings to Fulton a number of high-quality applied engineering programs and additional research facilities and programs.”

In recent years, ASU has constructed new academic facilities at Poly, built a residential life academic village, and added new recreation facilities. The goal remains to have 15,000 to 20,000 students there.

“The merger of CTI and the Fulton Schools represents a logical fusion of two very successful programs,” said ASU Provost Robert Page. “It will provide our students with a better-defined set of program options and allow new synergistic connections among our faculty.”

Both CTI and the Fulton Schools share a strong interest in innovative, experiential education, student success and use-inspired research directed toward solving societal challenges in areas such as energy, health, sustainability, education and security.

The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering is one of the largest engineering schools in the United States, with more than 10,000 students. CTI has more than 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. The Fulton Schools undergraduate program ranking from U.S. News & World Report puts them in the top 25 percent of ranked programs. Both schools have faculty that have been honored with the highest awards in their fields.

Mitzi Montoya, who has served as vice provost and dean of ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation since 2011, has been promoted to vice president for entrepreneurship and innovation in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development and university dean for entrepreneurship and innovation. In this new role, Montoya will synthesize activities across campuses and continue to enrich the entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem.

During her time as dean of CTI, Montoya spearheaded several initiatives designed to promote and support entrepreneurship. She was pivotal in bringing TechShop – a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio with locations nationwide – to the ASU Chandler Innovation Center. She also launched iProjects, which connects ASU students with industry to solve real business problems.

bioscience

ASU joins STEM mentoring initiative

Today, the College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) at Arizona State University announced its partnership with the “Million Women Mentors” (MWM) initiative. MWM will launch Jan. 8, 2014 during National Mentoring Month, in Washington, D.C at the National Press Club. The initiative will support the engagement of one million science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) mentors – male and female – to increase the interest and confidence of girls and young women to pursue and succeed in STEM degrees and careers.

As a partner in the movement to increase the representation of women in STEM degree programs and careers, CTI has joined with MWM to help proliferate the opportunities for young girls to engage with STEM mentors. The partnership with MWM aligns with CTI’s recently developed Women’s Council for Science and Engineering that brings together partners from the community, college and industry to support academic initiatives and scholarships for women students pursuing STEM degrees at CTI.

“The underrepresentation of girls and women in STEM is of national concern,” said Mitzi Montoya, vice provost and dean of CTI. “It isn’t enough any more to just raise awareness, we need to start implementing change that will move the needle. As a partner in the Million Women Mentors program we are part of a national movement that can inspire more young girls to pursue STEM degrees and careers, as well as mentor and sponsor them along the way.”

In the past 10 years, growth in STEM jobs has been three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs. Today 80% of the fastest growing occupations in the United States depend on mastery of mathematics and knowledge and skills in hard sciences. While women comprise 48% of the U.S. workforce, just 24% are in STEM fields, a statistic that has held constant for nearly the last decade. While 75% of all college students are women and students of color, they represent only 45% of STEM degrees earned each year. Too many of these young women begin in STEM degree but leave those degree paths despite their good academic standing, often citing uncomfortable classroom experiences and disconcerting climate. Even when women earn a STEM degree, they are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM field even though STEM jobs pay more and have a lower wage gap: 92 cents on a dollar versus 75 cents in other fields.

Even more concerning is the underrepresentation of women in engineering, specifically. In 2013, women made up only 19% of the national engineering class, a mere one percentage point increase from 2009. This, along with the need to increase representation in other science, technology and math fields is what drives special academic initiatives like the Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) club at CTI.

Million Women Mentors is a collective effort of more than 40 non-profit, media, education and government industry partners and nine corporate sponsors. Through efforts planned during National Mentoring Month, CTI will actively engage girls, mentoring and STEM. CTI will host a Badge Blast & Imagine Engineering Day for the Girl Scouts—Arizona Cactus—Pine Council, Inc., from 9am-3pm on January 25. The fun-filled day of hands-on badge activities and engineering-focused projects will engage girls in grades two through 12 with the opportunities found in STEM degrees and careers.

To become involved with CTI or Million Women Mentors you can find more information by visiting: innovation.asu.edu and MillionWomenMentors.org.

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ASU Polytechnic Students Take $2 Challenge

More than 30 students at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, located at 7001 E Williams Field Rd, will abstain from modern-day luxuries and challenge themselves to live on two dollars a day and in cardboard-box houses from Nov., 12-15, 2013.  Students will convene outside the Student Union and begin building their homes at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 12th.

The Two Dollar Challenge, a national experiential learning exercise and poverty action program, is designed to give students an opportunity to step out of their daily lives and more tangibly reflect upon the daily and prolonged challenges of living in poverty while raising awareness and funds to support economic development organizations.

This Challenge is distinct from your average charity drive for three reasons. First, it asks students to restrict their consumption and live by other rules designed to simulate poverty. This experience gives students a glimpse of how nearly half of the world’s population lives every day. Second, the Two Dollar Challenge participants will raise funds for the cause of their choice. Third, through the experience and accompanying discussion students are educated about the complexity of world poverty. Student groups can become immediate actors in the eradication of global poverty and gain the experience to become passionate leaders in the field for the future.

“This is our second year partnering with Esperança and our students are looking forward to the challenge,” said Mark Henderson, engineering professor and co-founder of GlobalResolve at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.  “During the three day Challenge, the students will clean dorm rooms, hold car washes and do other odd jobs to make money to purchase food and live.  It will be an eye-opening experience for them to see what poverty feels like.”

The students will also be holding a shoe drive to help fund Esperança’s programs.  Esperança is a nonprofit that improves health and provides hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.  The general public can drop off their gently used shoes at the Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa anytime during the three day challenge, Nov., 12-15, 2013.

“We’re excited to be a part of ASU’s Two Dollar Challenge,” said Tom Egan, executive director, Esperança.  “We offer programs and services in five countries and our volunteers are always surprised by the living conditions.  People in Bolivia and Nicaragua don’t always have access to clean water and food, they are disease stricken and don’t have stable homes to live in.  The Two Dollar Challenge is an opportunity for us to bring awareness to poverty locally, as well as nationally and internationally.”

renewable energy projects

SRP, ASU partner to research renewable energy initiatives

Salt River Project (SRP) and the Conservation and Renewable Energy Collaboratory (CREC) at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) have partnered for a second year to award a $170,000 grant to fund research initiatives in renewable energy and conservation.

This year the SRP-CREC research program selected four projects for funding. Projects include: reliability and performance testing of batteries in hot and dry climates; solar hot water system testing and evaluation; use of algae for bioremediation of water; and evaluation of solar photovoltaic (PV) performance and degradation.

“CTI faculty and students collaboratively work with our industry partners like SRP to define important, use-inspired research problems,” said Mitzi Montoya, vice provost and dean of CTI. “Industry partners like SRP are the foundation of the college and provide an important component of our project-based learning and applied research model.”

In addition to its sponsorship of the CREC research program, SRP has been a long-standing supporter and sponsor of the iProjects program at CTI. iProjects pair students with mentors and companies to find solutions to real world-challenges. This year, two student teams will work on projects that will benefit SRP and the electric utility industry. One team will develop an electrical model that will allow the utility industry to better plan for and forecast the impact of distributed generation and energy storage methods on high penetration utility systems. A second team will work to develop a portable battery impedance tester for battery technicians to monitor battery state of health on solar installations and substations.

“During our partnership with CTI, we have engaged in innovative research with talented faculty and students on important issues affecting SRP and our customers,” said John Sullivan, SRP’s associate general manager and chief resources executive.  “We are pleased with the collaborative relationship that SRP is developing with CTI, and we look forward to continuing to develop this important partnership in the coming year.”