Tag Archives: Dr. Robert Arceci


CTCA hosts its first cancer treatments conference

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Western Regional Medical Center (Western) is hosting its first ever Annual New Treatments in Oncology (ANTO) conference, focused on advances in cancer research, new treatments and patient care. The two-day ANTO event will take place on May 1-2 at the W Scottsdale hotel.

“We believe we have a unique opportunity to share with colleagues, caregivers and the general public some of the best new scientific innovations and discoveries being made every day to help our patients,” said Dr. Glen Weiss, M.D., M.B.A., who serves as a Medical Oncologist and Director of Clinical Research at CTCA® Western in Goodyear, Ariz., supervising more than 20 clinical trials involving hundreds of patients.

ANTO is designed for practicing oncologists, scientists, students, and others in the field of cancer care who are interested in cutting-edge clinical cancer developments and treatment approaches.

The weekend is structured similarly to meetings of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO®), the nation’s two largest cancer and oncology professional organizations.

“We’ve designed this first conference as a potential national forum for cancer-care innovations, creating a space where some of the top leaders in their respective fields of research can share their knowledge, leading to a better, healthier future for all of us,” Dr. Weiss said.

Organizers hope participants will take away from ANTO: an increased knowledge of new treatments in oncology, including new methods for disease response monitoring; familiarity with the need and importance of drug development, and principles of systemic cancer therapy; and recognition of how new treatments may be incorporated into the care of cancer patients.

A scientific poster session will be held on the first day, Friday, May 1, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Submission of scientific abstracts for ANTO are welcome. The deadline for submitting abstract posters is April 10. More information: Preparation & Submission of Abstract Guidelines.

The second day, Saturday, May 2, is devoted to expert presentations. Among the presenters are: Dr. Robert Dreicer, University of Virginia; Dr. Ryan Corcoran, Massachusetts General Hospital; Dr. Everett Vokes, University of Chicago; Dr. Daniel Pollyea, University of Colorado; Dr. Ron Korn, Imaging Endpoints; Dr. Robert Arceci, Phoenix Children’s Hospital; Dr. Luis Diaz Jr., Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Natasha Leighl, Princess Margaret Hospital; and Dr. Weiss of CTCA.

“Staying on top of the most current developments in understanding and treating cancer is of essential importance in helping our patients receive state-of-the-art clinical trials. This is true for patients of all ages, both young and old,” said Dr. Arceci, M.D., Ph.D. “This type of gathering is a terrific way to exchange ideas about the challenges and promises for treating our patients.”

Cost of the two-day ANTO event is $150 for physicians; $50 for students and fellows; free for students, medical residents and research fellows who are first authors on accepted abstract posters.

Registration will be reimbursed upon completion of conference evaluation for all non-Arizona residents, nurses, RD, ND, and PCPs. Deadline for free registration is April 15.

Participants also will receive seven hours of Continuing Medical Education credits, approved by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America CME Committee.

The W Scottsdale, 7277 E. Camelback Road, Scottsdale, AZ, 85251, is one of Arizona’s newest high-end resorts, conveniently located in midtown Scottsdale near some of the West’s best arts, fashion and entertainment districts. Call for reservations at: 1-312-836-0100. Lunch will be provided on May 1. Breakfast and lunch will be provided May 2. Conference times both days are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Mountain Standard Time).

childrens hospital

Phoenix Children’s get $1M Grant to Fund Cancer Research

Phoenix Children’s Hospital was selected to receive a $1 million, two-year grant to study new treatments for childhood cancer by the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a volunteer-driven and donor-centered charity dedicated to raising money for childhood cancer research.

This grant is part of the Pathway Directed Treatment for Refractory AML Consortium, a group of institutions across the country committed to finding ways to better treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML). If AML does not respond to chemotherapy after relapse, chances for survival are low, leading to poorer survival rates than other forms of childhood cancer.

The team, led by Dr. Robert Arceci, medical director of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Phoenix Children’s, has identified important changes in AML that can be exploited to develop more effective and less toxic treatments using new types of drugs. The consortium focuses on the pathways that are needed for leukemia survival and developing pathway-directed clinical trials to improve outcomes for this group of patients with no other treatment options.

“Our hope is to change the manner in which treatments are used and tested so that they target the complex changes that are responsible for driving the leukemia,” Dr. Arceci explains. “We will apply a computer-based learning approach to improve our understanding of why some forms of leukemia respond to treatments and others do not, thus leading to a continuous improvement of our ability to more effectively treat patients.”

Dr. Arceci also serves as co-director of the Ronald A. Matricaria Institute of Molecular Medicine at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, a collaboration with Translational Genomics Institute and University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix dedicated to unlocking genetic codes and developing drug therapies in real time to improve the outcome for thousands of young patients diagnosed with cancer.

“These grants are one step toward filling the critical gap that exists between the research dollars spent per child with cancer and those spent per adult,” says Kathleen Ruddy, chief executive officer of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, which has committed a total of $22 million to cancer research this summer alone. “When one considers the total landscape of available funding from government, industry and philanthropy, it is apparent children are being left behind. Great progress has been made in treatments for many types of cancers that plague adults, but the same level of progress has been made in only a few forms of cancer in children. That needs to change.”