Tag Archives: March – April 2011

Good Samaritan Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Health Care Industry Has Flourished From Cottages To World-Class Facilities

A Century of Care

From cottages to world-class facilities, Arizona’s health care industry has flourished

Mayo Clinic Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 In the nearly 100 years since Arizona became a state, the health care sector has become a powerful economic force.

According to a study by Arizona State University’s L. William Seidman Research Institute, Arizona’s hospital community alone employs more than 80,000 people and contributes $11.5 billion to the gross state product. Indirectly, hospitals create about 120,000 additional jobs, more than the combined populations of Coconino, Graham and Santa Cruz counties.

Sisters of Mercy

It all started some 17 years before statehood in January 1895, when the Sisters of Mercy had collected enough money to rent a six-bedroom cottage at Fourth and Polk streets in Downtown Phoenix. Each room was equipped with two beds for TB patients, and thus was born St. Joseph’s Sanitarium, predecessor of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and the first hospital in Phoenix. Downtown Phoenix 1900s - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

In the mid-1940s, the nuns purchased 10 acres at Third Avenue and Thomas Road, which was part of an old dairy farm. Today, St. Joseph’s is a 670-bed, not-for-profit hospital that is one of the cornerstones of the state’s health care industry.

A second giant in health care, Good Samaritan Hospital of Phoenix, launched its first facility in an apartment building at Third Street near Van Buren in 1911. Initially incorporated as the Arizona Deaconess Hospital and Home, it opened with 15 beds.

One-hundred years later, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Downtown Phoenix is the flagship of Banner Health, with more than 662 licensed patient care beds. Banner Good Samaritan employs more than 4,200 health care professionals and support staff. Nearly 1,700 physicians representing more than 50 specialties work with Banner Good Samaritan staff to care for more than 43,000 inpatients a year.

Another early entry in the health care scene was the State Asylum for the Insane, which was rebuilt after a fire in 1911. In 1924, the asylum was informally renamed Arizona State Hospital.

Established in 1943 as a community hospital, Tucson Medical Center is among the 300 largest hospitals in the country. It is licensed for 650 adult and skilled nursing beds, and serves more than 30,000 inpatients and 122,000 outpatients a year.

St. Luke Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011In 1971, University Medical Center — a private, nonprofit hospital located at the Arizona Health Sciences Center adjacent to the University of Arizona in Tucson — was established. UMC is Arizona’s only academic medical center, and earlier this year it became an international focal point for neurosurgery and trauma care after a gunman shot and wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and killed six people.

In Northern Arizona, the Flagstaff Medical Center, a not-for-profit hospital, was founded in 1936. A part of the Northern Arizona Healthcare family, it has some 270 beds and its medical staff includes about 200 physicians. Among its specialties are cancer, heart and sports medicine.

Health care continues to be a concern on Indian reservations throughout Arizona, particularly in some of the remote regions. A relatively new program, the American Indian Research Center for Health is designed to improve the health status of Native Americans and increase the number of Native American scientists and health professionals engaged in research. Classes for the student-training component of the program are held at the University of Arizona.

Read more…

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Intellectual Property And International Trade And Finance Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.



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Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
Information Technology

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE LAW

Ballard Spahr

Brian W. LaCorte
Partner
602-798-5449

Donna H. Catalfio
Partner
602-798-5453

John M. Vassiliades
Of Counsel
602-798-5445

Andrea L. Stone
Associate
602-798-5430

Bryan Cave

George Chen
Partner
602-364-7367

Lawrence Kurland
Partner
602-364-7078

Allan Watts
Counsel
602-364-7331

Davis Miles

Timothy D. Ronan
Partner
480-344-4068

Yvonne E. Tagart
Attorney
480-344-4053

Dioguardi Flynn

John P. Flynn
Partner
480-951-8800

DLA Piper

Mark A. Nadeau
Co-Managing Partner, Phoenix Office
480-606-5110

Gregory R. Hall
Partner
480-606-5128

Fennemore Craig

Ray K. Harris
Shareholder
602-916-5414

Galbut & Galbut

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Olivier Beabeau
Member
602-955-1455

Gallagher & Kennedy

Steven T. Lawrence
Shareholder
602-530-8077

Robert J. Itri
Shareholder
602 530-8019

Gammage & Burnham

Christopher A. Womack
Partner
602-256-0566

George U. Winney
Partner
602-256-0566

Greenberg Traurig

John R. Cummerford
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gerald L. Fellows
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Frank G. Long
Of Counsel
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

John L. Hay
Member
602-257-7468

Christina M. Noyes
Member
602-257-7488

Tom Chauncey II
Member
602-257-7479

Jaburg|Wilk

Maria Crimi Speth
Shareholder
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Richard Lieberman
Partner
602-262-5935

Jimmie W. Pursell
Partner
602-262-5812

Lewis and Roca

Jennifer Van Kirk
Partner
602-262-0203

Sean Garrison
Partner
602-239-7434

Bruce Samuels
Partner
602-262-0216

Emily Bayton
Partner
602-262-5768

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

Scot Claus
Shareholder
602-285-5086

Osborn Maledon

Jonathan Ariano
Member
602-640-9311

Brett Dunkelman
Member
602-640-9313

Perkins Coie

Jonathan James
Partner
602-351-8440

Chad Campbell
Partner
602-351-8393

Polsinelli Shughart

Christine McAuliffe
Shareholder
602-650-2061

Edward R. Glady Jr. (Ed)
Shareholder
602-650-2004

Yu Cai, Ph.D.
Associate
602-650-2044

Quarles & Brady

Dale Regelman
Partner
520-770-8703

Gavin J. Milczarek-Desai
Partner
520-770-8716

Jessica Franken
Partner
602-230-5520

Brad DeSandro
Partner
602-229-5355

Karen Dickinson
Partner
602-230-5511

Deanna Conn
Partner
520-770-8715

Rose Law Group

Joe Dylo
Associate
480-240-5641

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Fred Bellamy
Shareholder
602-440-4835

Jessica Benford
Associate
602-440-4866

Sacks Tierney

James W. Armstrong
Shareholder
480-425-2628

Sanders & Parks

Michelle Breit
Of Counsel
602-532-5647

Snell & Wilmer

Andy Halaby
Partner
602-382-6277

Charles F. Hauff Jr.
Partner
602-382-6314

Sid Leach
Partner
602-382-6372

David E. Rogers
Partner
602-382-6225

Howard I. Sobelman
Partner
602-382-6228

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

A.J. Moss
Partner
602-528-4839

Steptoe & Johnson

David J. Bodney
Partner
602-257-5212

Peter S. Kozinets
Of Counsel
602-257-5250

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Karen L. Liepmann
Partner
602-212-8532

The Noblitt Group

Daniel J. Noblitt
Managing Attorney
480-994-9888

Tiffany & Bosco

Dow Glenn Ostlund
Shareholder
602-255-6008

Richard E. Oney
Shareholder
602-255-6094

Shahpar Shahpar
Shareholder
602-255-6020

Bryan Cave

Jeronimo Gomez del Campo
Foreign Legal Consultant
602-364-7065

Juan Moreno
Counsel
602-364-7219

DLA Piper

Mark A. Nadeau
Co-Managing Partner, Phoenix Office
480-606-5110

Steven D. Pidgeon
Co-Managing Partner, Phoenix Office
480-606-5124

Kate Frenzinger  
Associate
480-606-5114

Fennemore Craig

Hector G. Arana
Shareholder
520-281-3482

Kimberly A. Howard Arana
Shareholder
520-281-3481

Galbut & Galbut

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Olivier Beabeau
Member
602-955-1455

Gammage & Burnham

Kevin R. Merritt
Partner
602-256-0566

Randall S. Dalton
Partner
602-256-0566

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Gerald “Buzz” Alston
Partner
602-262-5966

Jack N. Rudel
Partner
602-262-5951

William R. Herrera
Partner
602-262-5835

Quarles & Brady

Steve Emerick
Partner
602-230-5517

Karen Dickinson
Partner
602-230-5511

Rose Law Group

Ann-Marie Anderson
Associate
480-240-5641

Snell & Wilmer

Barb Dawson
Partner
602-382-6235

David A. Sprentall
Partner
602-382-6260







































































































.

Construction Industry, AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Arizona Construction Industry Gains Footing In 2011

Fueled by education-related projects, another new Cactus League spring training facility and Indian casinos, the construction industry in Arizona appears to be gaining footing in 2011.

Though not experiencing a full-scale rebound, contractors have reasons to be somewhat optimistic. For example, K-12 school districts around the state won voter approval in November of bond issues and budget overrides totaling more than $500M — but not all of the money is earmarked for construction or remodeling.

Contractors also anticipate increased activity in the solar energy field, thanks in part to SB 1403, approved in 2009. The law offers tax incentives for businesses locating alternative and solar energy manufacturing plants and corporate headquarters in Arizona.

Perhaps the highest-profile project that attracted numerous general contractors is the proposed spring training stadium and facilities for the Chicago Cubs in Mesa. Beth Huning, Mesa city engineer, says the city hopes to break ground on the 100-plus acre project southeast of the intersection of the Loop 101 and 202 freeways by the end of 2011. The Cubs want to use their new facility for spring training in 2013.

Mesa voters on Nov. 2 approved a ballot measure that allows the city to spend up to $84M for a new stadium, practice fields and training facilities. In addition, city officials have promised to spend no more than $15M for associated infrastructure improvements. The Cubs will be responsible for any cost overruns, and plan to build a “Wrigleyville West” entertainment and retail complex next to the baseball facilities.

Mortenson Construction, which just completed Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the new spring training home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies at Loop 101 north of Indian Bend Road on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, was among the general contractors vying for the Cubs facility.

George Forristall, director of business development for Mortenson, says the firm is involved in major projects at all three state universities. He cites two Arizona State University recreation facilities — one at the Polytechnic campus in Mesa and one at the ASU West campus — each in the $17M range; a $53M Health & Learning Center at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff that may not break ground until 2012; and an expansion of the north end zone at the University of Arizona football stadium in Tucson. The UA project, estimated at $50M, includes replacing aluminum seating with 5,000 upgraded seats, new concession concourses, additional restrooms, and elevators to improve access for the disabled.

Robert “Bo” Calbert, Southwest regional president of McCarthy Building Companies, says his firm expects to be active in public school projects, considering the success of numerous bond issues and budget overrides totaling a half-billion dollars.

“The K-12 market is a pretty big market for us,” Calbert says. “We expect to see several projects this year — not a ton compared to the last few years, but it’s a steady market.”

Among the successful school districts were Kyrene Elementary, $116.9M; Scottsdale Unified, $115M; Chandler Unified, $84.3M; Washington Elementary, $65M; and Marana Unified, $43M.

“A lot of schools will do upgrades and renovations, but not much new construction,” Calbert says. “Considering the state of the economy, it’s a fairly active market, albeit smaller than two-three years ago.”

He suggests a reason for the wave of successful bond issues: “The public has seen … state cuts in education spending. If not for bond issues, the needs of these schools would not be met.”

Many of the projects will involve heating and air-conditioning upgrades, with some schools opting for solar devices.

McCarthy, making a big push into solar, has secured one contract and was closing in on a second substantial deal, Calbert says. He sees solar, particularly in Arizona with abundant sunshine and relatively low-cost construction, as an industry for the present and future, though challenges remain for financing.

“We’re betting on it,” he says.

McCarthy is building a new hotel for the Pasqua Yaqui Tribe near Tucson and hopes to land the Navajo Nation’s proposed Twin Arrows Casino in Northern Arizona. And there is talk of a new Fort McDowell Mohave-Apache casino near Fountain Hills, Calbert says.

In addition, despite mounting local opposition, David Jones, president and CEO of the Arizona Contractors Association, says he expects the Tohono O’odham Nation to be successful in building a resort and casino adjacent to Glendale for an estimated $500M. Also in 2011, Jones sees a continuation of healthcare and hospital construction, solar projects in the Kingman and Gila Bend areas, a private prison near Prescott, mining projects southeast of Tucson and near Patagonia, and perhaps federal projects to beef-up security along the border with Mexico.

Forristall says the formation of the Arizona Commerce Authority, a public/private agency to spur economic development, is “a very positive sign.” He also praises the efforts of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council in utilizing the tools in SB 1403 to attract solar projects.

Forristall sees a gradual recovery in 2011. He says 2009 was a tough year for construction and 2010 basically maintained the status quo. “I see 2011 — not a U-shape — but I see a bit more activity, more optimism,” he says. “So we’re positive about the outlook.”

For more information about the construction industry and the projects mentioned in this story, visit:

mortenson.com

mccarthy.com

mesaaz.gov/engineering/cubs.aspx

AZRE March/April 2011 

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Workers’ Compensation Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.



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Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
Information Technology

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WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

Fennemore Craig

Scott M. Finical
Shareholder
602-916-5300

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Mike Moberly
Shareholder
602-440-4821

John Fry
Shareholder
602-440-4867

Snell & Wilmer

Barbara L. McCloud
Partner
602-382-6543

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Franchise And Health Care Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.



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Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
Information Technology

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FRANCHISE

HEALTH CARE

Davis Miles

Timothy D. Ronan
Partner
480-344-4068

Fennemore Craig

Anne L. Kleindienst
Shareholder
602-916-5392

Greenberg Traurig

James A. Ullman
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Jeffrey H. Wolf
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Daniel B. Warshawsky
Attorney
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

Christina M. Noyes
Member
602-257-7488

John L. Hay
Member
602-257-7468

Charles W. Wirken
Member
602-257-7959

Jaburg|Wilk

Susan Wells
Partner
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Richard Lieberman
Partner
602-262-5935

Rose Law Group

Ann-Marie Anderson
Associate
480-240-5643

Snell & Wilmer

David E. Rauch
Partner
602-382-6294

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Karen L. Liepmann
Partner
602-212-8532



















































.

Ballard Spahr

Brian Schulman
Partner
602-798-5407

Comitz | Beethe

Edward O. Comitz
Member
480-998-7800

Patrick T. Stanley
Counsel
480-998-7800

Davis Miles

Timothy D. Ronan
Partner
480-344-4068

Fennemore Craig

Anne L. Kleindienst
Shareholder
602-916-5392

Galbut & Galbut

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Charles J. Morrow
Associate
602-955-1455

Gammage & Burnham

Richard B. Burnham
Partner
602-256-0566

Curtis A. Ullman
Partner
602-256-0566

Susan L. Watchman
Partner
602-256-0566

John R. Dacey
Partner
602-256-0566

Cameron A. Artigue
Partner
602-256-0566

George U. Winney
Partner
602-256-0566

Greenberg Traurig

Lawrence J. Rosenfeld
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

James W. Kaucher
Member
520-388-4792

Thomas M. Murphy
Member
520-205-4759

Jaburg|Wilk

Kraig Marton
Shareholder
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Jay A. Fradkin
Partner
602-262-5921

Frederick M. Cummings
Partner
602-262-5903

Richard K. Delo
Partner
602-262-5880

Richard Lieberman
Partner
602-262-5935

Lewis and Roca

Roy Kyle
Partner
520-629-4466

Matthew Sweger
Partner
520-629-4431

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

Jerry Gaffaney
Shareholder
602-285-5005

Quarles & Brady

Roger Morris
Partner
602-229-5269

Melody Emmert
Of Counsel
602-229-5315

Brenda Maloney
Associate
602-229-5774

Christine Cassetta
Associate
602-229-5258

Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros

William W. Drury
Shareholder
602-256-3012

Sacks Tierney

Steven M. Goldstein
Shareholder
480-425-2613

Sanders & Parks

Winn L. Sammons
Senior Shareholder
602-532-5786

Snell & Wilmer

Terry Roman
Partner
602-382-6293

Barry D. Halpern
Partner
602-382-6345

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

John Welch
Partner
602-528-4940

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Karen L. Liepmann
Partner
602-212-8532

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Labor And Employment And Mediation Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.



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Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
Information Technology

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LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT

MEDIATION

Ballard Spahr

John G. Kerkorian
Partner
602-798-5408

Isaac P. Hernandez
Associate
602-798-5476

Bryan Cave

Jay Zweig
Partner
602-364-7300

Buchalter Nemer

Roger W. Hall
Of Counsel
480-383-1800

Nancy K. Swift
Senior Counsel
480-383-1800

Davis Miles

Timothy D. Ronan
Partner
480-344-4068

Yvonne E. Tagart
Attorney
480-344-4053

Dioguardi Flynn

John P. Flynn
Partner
480-951-8800

Fennemore Craig

Amy Abdo
Shareholder
602-916-5399

John J. Balitis
Shareholder
602-916-5316

Donald R. Gilbert
Shareholder
602-916-5306

Lori A. Higuera
Shareholder
602-916-5387

Barney M. Holtzman
Shareholder
520-879-6810

Janice Procter-Murphy
Shareholder
602-916-5331

Ronald J. Stolkin
Shareholder
602-916-5321

Galbut & Galbut

Olivier Beabeau
Member
602-955-1455

Gallagher & Kennedy

Donald Peder Johnsen
Shareholder
602-530-8437

Gammage & Burnham

Michael R. King
Partner
602-256-0566

Richard K. Mahrle
Partner
602-256-0566

Greenberg Traurig

Lawrence J. Rosenfeld
Shareholder
602-445-8000

John Alan Doran
Shareholder
602-445-8000

John F. Lomax Jr.
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Daniel Pasternak
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

Robert D. Haws
Member
602-257-7976

Jennifer N. MacLennan
Member
602-257-7475

Jaburg|Wilk

Kraig Marton
Shareholder
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

John J. Egbert
Partner
602-262-5994

Janet B. Hutchison
Partner
602-262-5945

Keith F. Overholt
Partner
602-262-5837

Richard Lieberman
Partner
602-262-5935

Lewis and Roca

Mary Ellen Simonson
Partner
602-262-5317

Todd Hale
Partner
520-629-4433

Abbe Goncharsky
Partner
520-838-7711

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

Anne Tiffen
Shareholder
602-285-5019

Sam Coffman
Shareholder
602-285-5029

Ogletree Deakins

L. Eric Dowell
Managing Shareholder
602-778-3700

Joseph T. Clees
Shareholder
602-778-3700

Tibor Nagy
Shareholder
520-544-0300

Tracy A. Miller
Shareholder
602-778-3700

Thomas D. Arn
Shareholder
602-778-3700

Leah S. Freed
Shareholder
602-778-3700

James K. Mackie
Shareholder
520-544-0300

Kerry S. Martin
Shareholder
602-778-3700

Osborn Maledon

Scott Rodgers
Member
602-640-9344

Perkins Coie

Tawn Pritchette
Partner
602-351-8430

Phil Higdon
Partner
602-351-8468

Dan Barr
Partner
602-351-8085

Quarles & Brady

Jon Pettibone
Partner
602-230-5572

David Barton
Partner
602-230-5526

Dawn Valdivia
Partner
602-229-5291

Christine Burns
Partner
602-230-5544

Eric Johnson
Partner
602-229-5425

Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros

James L. Blair
Shareholder
602-256-3003

Rose Law Group

Lauren Elrod
Associate
480-240-5644

Ann-Marie Anderson
Associate
480-240-5643

Laura Bianchi
Associate
480-5646

Ryan Rapp & Underwood

Polly S. Rapp
Partner
602-280-1000

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Mike Moberly
Shareholder
602-440-4821

Nate Neimuth
Shareholder
602-440-4810

Andrea Lisenbee
Shareholder
602-440-4832

John Fry
Shareholder
602-440-4867

Sacks Tierney

Sharon S. Moyer
Shareholder
480-425-2606

Steven R. Beeghley
Shareholder
480-425-2686

Adrian L. Barton
Associate
480-425-2629

Sanders & Parks

Debora L. Verdier
Shareholder
602-532-5760

Sherman & Howard

Robert J. Deeny
Member
602-240-3018

Thomas J. Kennedy
Member
480-624-2725

William A. Wright
Member
602-240-3086

Snell & Wilmer
Rebecca A. Winterscheidt
Partner
602-382-6343

Joshua R. Woodard
Partner
602-382-6281

William R. Hayden
Partner
602-382-6329

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

D. Lewis Clark Jr.
Partner
602-528-4065

Don Wall
Partner
602-528-4005

Steptoe & Johnson

Lawrence A. Katz
Partner
602-257-5211

Stephanie J. Quincy
Partner
602-257-5230

Mark G. Kisicki
Partner
602-257-5239

Steven D. Wheeless
Partner
602-257-5234

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Lonnie J. Williams
Partner
602-212-8505

M. Elizabeth Nillen
Of Counsel
602-212-8558

Tiffany & Bosco

Pamela L. Kingsley
Shareholder
602-255-6015

Stephen P. Linzer
Shareholder
602-452-2748

Udall, Shumway & Lyons

Bradley D. Gardner
Shareholder
480-461-5323

Ballard Spahr

Brian Schulman
Partner
602-798-5407

Davis Miles

Mark E. Lassiter
Partner
480-344-4455

Gregory L. Miles
Partner
480-344-4575

Engelman Berger

David Wm. Engelman
Partner
602-271-9090

Steven N. Berger
Partner
602-271-9090

Galbut & Galbut

Martin R. Galbut
Chairman
602-955-1455

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Gust Rosenfeld

Richard A. Segal
Member
602-257-7433

Wendy N. Weigand
Member
602-257-7410

Robert D. Haws
Member
602-257-7976

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Gerald “Buzz” Alston
Partner
602-262-5966

Douglas G. Zimmerman
Partner
602-262-5963

Lewis and Roca

Richard Goldsmith
Partner
602-262-5341

Craig Phillips
Partner
602-262-5345

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

Gary L. Birnbaum
Managing Director
602-285-5009

Noel Fidel
Of-Counsel
602-285-5044

Michael Rubin
Shareholder
602-285-5008

Charles Price
Shareholder
602-285-5042

Richard A. Friedlander
Shareholder
602-285-5004

Sacks Tierney

David C. Tierney
Shareholder
480-425-2620

Sharon B. Shively
Shareholder
480-425-2625

Sanders & Parks

Mark G. Worischeck
Managing Shareholder
602-532-5795

Snell & Wilmer

Barb Dawson
Partner
602-382-6235

Paul J. Giancola
Partner
602-382-6324

Tiffany & Bosco

Robert V. Kerrick
Shareholder
602-255-6079































































































































.

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Researcher

Honoree: Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute

Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer's InstituteDr. Eric Reiman’s goal as a researcher is to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease before another generation is lost. In order to achieve this goal, Reiman conducts research utilizing brain imaging, genomics, early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease, disease-slowing therapies and prevention therapies.

He serves as executive director of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, clinical director of the Neurogenomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, professor and associate head of psychiatry at the University of Arizona and director of the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium.

In using brain-imaging technology, Reiman and his team are characterizing regions of the brain that are used for different aspects of emotion, memory, pain, hunger and satiation, and those that work together to create anxiety disorders. For years, Reiman and his team also have used brain-imaging techniques to detect and record brain changes in cognitively normal carriers and non-carriers of a common Alzheimer’s susceptibility gene. In 2007, Reiman and his colleagues published the first genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer’s disease and normal human memory.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.bannerhealth.com[/stextbox]


David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children's Neuroscience, Phoenix Children's HospitalFinalist: David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children’s Neuroscience, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. David Adelson has devoted much of his career to researching avenues that might improve the lives of people around the world, especially children. He founded the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH) and currently serves as its director. He also holds the position of division chief of neurosurgery at PCH. In the time he has off from his practice, Adelson is currently involved with eight separate research projects.

Included in those research projects is a multi-centered clinical trial with the Cool Kids Trial that is studying whether moderate hypothermia treatment can improve the outcomes of children who have experienced traumatic brain injury.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Product Liability And Public Finance Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.



[stextbox id="grey"]

Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
Information Technology

[/stextbox]


PRODUCT LIABILITY

PUBLIC FINANCE

Ballard Spahr

Brian Schulman
Partner
602-798-5407

Sara V. Ransom
Associate
602-798-5461

Bryan Cave

Sean McElenney
Partner
602-364-7379

Rodney Ott
Counsel
602-364-7407

James Smith
Partner
602-364-7011

Davis Miles

Kevin Fine
Partner
480-344-4993

J. Robert Tolman
Partner
480-344-4580

DLA Piper

Mark A. Nadeau
Co-Managing Partner, Phoenix Office
480-606-5110

Cynthia A. Ricketts
Partner
480-606-5112

Fennemore Craig

Christopher L. Callahan
Shareholder
602-916-5310

Graeme M. Hancock
Shareholder
602-916-5448

Gallagher & Kennedy

Patrick J. McGroder III
Shareholder
602-530-8181

Robert W. Boatman
Shareholder
602 530-8340

Jeffrey T. Pyburn
Shareholder
602 530-8576

Greenberg Traurig

Pamela M. Overton
Shareholder
602-445-8000

E. Jeffrey Walsh
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Polsinelli Shughart

Carlyle W. Hall III (Cary)
Shareholder
602-650-2095

Brian M. Flaherty
Associate
602-650-2016

Gust Rosenfeld

James H. Marburger
Member
602-257-7968

Peter Collins Jr.
Member
520-628-7073

James G. Speer
Member
602-257-7472

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Michael J. O’Connor
Partner
602-262-5889

Garrett J. Olexa
Partner
602-262-5863

Lewis and Roca

Craig Phillips
Partner
602-262-5345

Foster Robberson
Partner
602-262-5795

Steve Bressler
Partner
602-262-5376

Steve Hulsman
Partner
602-262-5313

Quarles & Brady

Brian Booker
Partner
602-229-5714

Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros

John A. Klecan
Shareholder
602-256-3075

Rose Law Group

Brian Bergin
Partner
480-240-5634

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

David Kash
Shareholder
602-440-4837

John Lemaster
Shareholder
602-440-4831

Rudy Parga
Shareholder
602-440-4848

Kara Ricupero
Shareholder
602-440-4820

Sanders & Parks

Robert J. Bruno
Senior Shareholder
602-532-5755

Sherman & Howard

Thomas M. Quigley
Member
602-240-3040

Daniel P. Beeks
Counsel
602-240-3058

Snell & Wilmer

Vaughn A. Crawford
Partner
602-382-6368

Patrick X. Fowler
Partner
602-382-6213

Bradley W. Petersen
Partner
602-382-6202

Ballard Spahr

William A. Hicks III
Partner
602-798-5423

Michele L. Bax
Partner
602-798-5483

Christopher J. Dodd
Associate
602-798-5428

Buchalter Nemer

William J. Gelm
Shareholder
480-383-1800

Greenberg Traurig

William R. DeHaan
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Michael Cafiso
Shareholder
602-445-8000

John S. Overdorff
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Brigitte Finley Green
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

Fred H. Rosenfeld
Member
602-257-7413

Scott W. Ruby
Member
602-257-7432

Timothy A. Stratton
Member
602-257-7465

James T. Giel
Member
602-257-7495

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

George C. Spilsbury
Partner
602-262-5885

Kutak Rock

Patrick A. Ray
Managing Partner
480-429-5000

Timothy C. Nash
Partner
480-429-5000

Dane K. Fernandes
Partner
480-429-5000

Anthony V. Giancana
Partner
480-429-5000

Jorge C. Albala
Partner
480-429-5000

James T. Barham Jr.
Partner
480-429-5000

Naomi J. Barnes
Partner
480-429-5000

Lewis and Roca

Bryant Barber
Partner
602-262-5375

Maria Spelleri
Partner
602-262-0264

Julie Arvo McKenzie
Partner
602-262-5373

Polsinelli Shughart

Thomas K. Irvine (Tom)
Shareholder
602-650-2094

Quarles & Brady

Scott Berg
Partner
602-229-5640

Matt Mehr
Partner
602-229-5288

Rose Law Group

Mike Smalley
Partner
480-505-3935

Court Rich
Partner
480-505-3937

Jordan Rose
Partner
480-505-3939

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

William Wilder
Shareholder
602-440-4802

Clarke Greger
Shareholder
602-440-4870

Snell & Wilmer

Jeffrey E. Beck
Partner
602-382-6316

Brian W. Burke
Partner
602-382-6379

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

Chuck E. James Jr.
Partner
602-528-4061

Robert L. Matia
Partner
602-528-4040

Timothy Pickrell
Partner
602-528-4031

Jennifer Cosper
Associate
602-528-4880

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

health care leadership awards - AZ Business Magazine 2011

HCLA 2011- Insurance

Honoree: David J. McIntyre Jr., President and CEO, TriWest Healthcare Alliance

David J. McIntyre Jr., President and CEO of Triwest Healthcare AllianceWith more than 27 years of experience in the health care industry, David J. McIntyre Jr. is the founder, CEO and president of TriWest Healthcare Alliance, which offers 2.7 million Americans associated with the military access to high-quality health care in the 21-state TRICARE West Region.

McIntyre travels around those states to meet with health care providers, military leaders, government officials and military support organization leaders to determine the current needs of the military health care system. He also keeps in touch with commanders of National Guard units, nearly 70 military treatment facilities and leaders of Veterans Affairs.

TriWest has responded to the expanding need of military health care since 2001 by educating families on military health care plans and increasing the Arizona provider network, especially in rural areas. TriWest also has initiated a case management program to ensure quality care for the military’s wounded, produced a downloadable CD set about combat stress and post-traumatic stress disorder, and supports camps for National Guard and military children. McIntyre leads a team of 1,700 employees, including 900 working in Arizona.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.triwest.com/"]http://www.triwest.com/ [/stextbox]


Finalist: Benton Davis, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of ArizonaBenton Davis, CEO of UnitedHealthCare of Arizona

As CEO of UnitedHealthcare of Arizona’s Western States, Benton Davis oversees a staff of more than 2,700 employees. Davis makes sure to be involved in all aspects of the company, including sales, customer service, physician relations, and employee recruitment and retention. Under his leadership, patient care has improved, patient readmissions have decreased, and health care costs have been tamed.

One of Davis’ projects is PlanBien, a first-of-its-kind insurance plan targeted at Arizona employers with Hispanic work forces. It offers culturally relevant health information and customer service programs in both Spanish and English, at no extra expense to employers or recipients.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.uhc.com/"]http://www.uhc.com/ [/stextbox]

Finalist: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Blue Cross Blue Shield of ArizonaBlue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) is a not-for-profit company based in Phoenix that employs more than 1,500 workers.

As an independent licensee of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, BCBSAZ strives to provide quality health care to its 1.3 million customers, while also giving back to the community.

One way that BCBSAZ provides quality service is through Walk On!, its key community program. Focusing on reducing obesity among children in Arizona, the program asks fifth-graders to walk at least 10,000 steps a day during a given period of time, while tracking their progress with a tool kit provided through the program. Walk On! is recognized across the nation.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.azblue.com/"]http://www.azblue.com/ [/stextbox]

hc-leadership-header

HCLA 2011 – Nurse Or Nursing Advocate

Honoree: Stacy Danahy, Director of Medical Operations, Arizona, Laser Spine Institute

Stacy Danhay, Director of Medical Operations, Arizona, Laser Spine InstituteDuring her 12 years in the health care industry, Stacy Danahy has displayed time and again that she is a true leader by going above and beyond to care for her patients. For the past two years, she has worked as director of medical operations at the Laser Spine Institute (LSI), a position that requires her to oversee patients, as well as other medical staff.
Her duties include answering questions from both patients and staff, determining the efficiency of the clinic as a whole, handling patients of concern, overseeing patient safety and infection control, educating and training staff, and managing inventory of supplies and medications.

What distinguishes Danahy is her dedication to providing quality care and comfort to all of her patients, no matter what the circumstances. She has been known to drive to the hotels of LSI patients as early as 5 a.m. to provide special care, such as the removal of stubborn catheters. She has also rubbed a patient’s feet and talked him through a claustrophobic experience, and has lain on the floor to ease the nerves of another anxious patient. She will do whatever the situation calls for in order to meet the emotional needs of her patients.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.laserspineinstitute.com[/stextbox]


Diane Drexler, Vice President of Patient Care Services, Cancer Treatment Centers of AmericaFinalist: Diane Drexler, Vice President of Patient Care Services, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Having worked nearly 20 years in health care, Diane Drexler is considered a leader in the industry. After working with many Banner hospitals and serving as Banner Estrella Medical Center’s first chief nursing officer, Drexler joined the senior management team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, where she oversees a staff of 75 nurses.

Under Drexler’s leadership, Cancer Treatment Centers of America became the first acute care facility in the state to be licensed with an Acuity Adaptable Nursing Unit. This new unit allows a patient to remain in the same room for all levels of acuity, including intensive care, and virtually eliminates bed transfers.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.cancercenter.com[/stextbox]


irginia Prendergast, Nurse Practitioner, Barrow Neurological InstituteFinalist: Virginia Prendergast, Nurse Practitioner, Barrow Neurological Institute

Virginia Prendergast has a very good reason for being so dedicated to the Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. She was born at St. Joseph’s and at age five convinced her father to take her on a tour of the hospital.
Prendergast had always wanted to be a nurse, and in 1979 she joined the neuroscience staff at St. Joseph’s. She rose through the ranks to become the youngest head nurse in intensive care. In 1993, she became the first neurosurgery nurse practitioner at Barrow.

In addition, Prendergast has developed and teaches a 20-week certification course to help nurses prepare for a national neuroscience nursing certification examination.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.thebarrow.org[/stextbox]

Flash Inc., Ken Tran - Scottsdale Living March/April 2011

Flash Inc.: The New Coating Standard

Local business owner Ken Tran have big plans to revolutionize an industry and maybe even change the world…one floor at a time — with Flash Inc.

Flash Inc. offers a system of floor finishing that utilizes an ultra-violet curing technology for increased finish clarity and no down time: there is no wait for the finish to dry! In addition, this technology exceeds the standards of safety and is eco-friendly with very low VOC’s and an almost non-existent odor.

Although UV technology is used everywhere, Flash Inc. is the first company to perfect the technology for field application. The steps are simple. First, the floor is prepared, then, the specially formulated Flash Inc. coating is applied and allowed to settle. Now comes the amazing part: a machine, not much larger than a lawn mower, equipped with a high power, ultra-violet light, is moved across the surface and it cures instantly. Kids, pets and heavy traffic are no longer a concern as the finish and curing process offer outstanding durability and scratch resistance.

School gymnasiums are traditionally recoated every year due to the excessive wear they receive. This process takes place in the summer months because the students are out of school. Using the Flash Inc. product and system, an award-winning high school in Wyoming was able to use their floor immediately after the finish was applied.

Recently, Flash Inc. completed a floor for Shiloh Church in Phoenix. Rob Brooks, the community director stated, “There was no odor and the product seals instantly. We sealed the floor at night and were able to be on it the next morning for church related activities.”

The durability of the Flash Inc. product eliminates the need for businesses to reseal every year, which greatly helps to cut costs.

The Flash Inc. system is a unique, well-tested method of floor finishing, whether for a school gym, restaurant, business or residence. Scheduling and down time never need to be a concern. From concept through delivery, the Flash Inc. system is the fastest, safest, and most efficient floor finishing procedure available today; it’s great on wood, indoor concrete and natural stone.

For more information about Flash Inc., call (602) 707-7181.

 

Route 66 - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Route 66: What Bridges Arizona To The Rest Of The Nation

Once dubbed the “Main Street of America,” Route 66 Twin Arrows Trading Post - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011not only is a landmark in U.S. history, but also played a vital role in developing Arizona’s economy as a major piece of the state’s infrastructure not long after statehood in 1912.

Arizona has always been known as a gateway to California. First, with the California Gold Rush of 1849, when thousands of people traveled through Arizona on their way to hunt for riches in the Golden State. Since there were no established routes through Arizona, these pioneers blazed their own trails, eventually creating a travel corridor. When built in Arizona, Route 66 followed this same path.

Commissioned in 1936, Route 66 began in Chicago and spanned all the way to Santa Monica, Calif. It was not fully paved until 1937.

Taking Route 66 through Arizona to California not only was popular because it was the easiest way to California, but also because of the tourist attractions and small towns that thrived along the route’s path. From the 1930s into the mid-1950s, Arizona’s tourism industry experienced a golden age as this historic route ran near the Grand Canyon and was a short jaunt away from the Painted Desert and Meteor Crater. In time, Route 66 took its place in American folklore, inspiring a popular song.

Route 66 entered Arizona through Holbrook, which attracted Easterners. Tourism instantly became an important part of its economy. It is reported that the first tourist camp in the U.S. was built in Holbrook. When Route 66 became the official transcontinental highway, tourism took off. It ceased during World War II when gasoline was rationed, but resumed after the war.

The advent of the automobile also was an economic boon to Winslow, which was a major stopping point along Route 66. Cafes, trading posts, motor courts and garages thrived. Similarly, Flagstaff’s economy grew. For years its motor courts and cafes catered to weary travelers.

Seligman, a railroad town founded in 1886, was referred to as the “Historic Birthplace of Route 66.” Its economy flourished when the Santa Fe Railroad established repair facilities there, including the Harvey House Road House.

The last major Route 66 town in Arizona was Kingman, although Oatman and Topock were officially the last towns along the old route. Again, the stretch of 66 that ran through Kingman’s downtown was rich in motels, restaurants and shops. That downtown is listed in the Historic Register for Historic Places. The neon signs of the 1940s proclaiming “Motel Row” remain intact.

But as the nation’s infrastructure grew and improved in the post-war boom years, Interstate-40 arose and Route 66 became irrelevant. Soon, much of the old route was decommissioned.

If it’s “fun in the sun” that attracts people to Arizona these days, it was Route 66 that paved the way for millions to visit and even more to stay and call the Grand Canyon State home.

For more information about Route 66, visit historic66.com.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

healthcare leadership awards - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

HCLA 2011- Hospital Executive

Honoree: David Veillette, President and CEO, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

David Veillette - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011David Veillette, president and CEO of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, is a leader and innovator in medical technology — and his accomplishments are evident across the country.

In 2002, he built the first all-digital heart hospital in the nation at Indiana Heart Hospital. Then, in 2008, Veillette established the first all-digital cancer hospital in the nation, Cancer Treatment Centers of America. The digital aspect of the hospital allows for improved efficiencies. It provides access to real-time patient data, improves communication across departments, creates development of treatment plans more quickly, reduces medication errors and cuts the turnaround time for lab results.

Living by the motto, “It’s only and always about the patient,” Veillette prefers to roam the halls of his hospital instead of sitting behind a desk. This way he can meet with hospital visitors and assess the experiences of his facility firsthand. Veillette also has an emotional investment in his patients, often holding a patient’s hand as he or she receives chemotherapy or drinking a cup of joe with a family member as they anxiously wait for their loved one to complete surgery.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.cancercenter.com/"]www.cancercenter.com[/stextbox]


Finalist: Jo Adkins, CEO, West Valley Hospital

Jo Adkins - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Overseeing a staff of nearly 600, Jo Adkins serves as CEO of West Valley Hospital in Goodyear. She has an ingrained commitment to excellence that allows her to transform mediocre hospitals into extraordinary facilities.

West Valley Hospital is an affiliate of Abrazo Health Care. Since Adkins’ arrival in 2008, the hospital is now a certified cardiac arrest center, a designated chest pain center, and a stroke center of excellence. Identified for its newfound commitment to excellence, West Valley Hospital also was recognized for Patient Safety and Pulmonary Care by HealthGrades. These changes are not a coincidence, but a product of Adkins’ determination, leadership and unwavering vision.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.abrazohealth.com/facilities/westvalley/home.aspx"]www.abrazohealth.com[/stextbox]

Finalist: Ruth W. Brinkley, RN, MSN, FACHE, President and CEO, Carondelet Health Network

Ruth Brinkley President and CEO of Carondelet Health NetworkThroughout her 30-year career in the health care industry, Ruth W. Brinkley has used her insight, wisdom, creativity and leadership to positively impact the organizations for which she works. She has anticipated and met the rapidly changing needs of the health care industry.

Brinkley joined Carondelet Health Network (CHN) in Tucson as president and CEO in 2008. She has developed four Centers of Excellence and led the investment in and development of Carondelet Neurological Institute.

She has also strengthened the financial performance of CHN from a $14 million operating loss to a projected $10 million profit in her first 18 months.

[stextbox id="grey" image="http://www.carondelet.org/"]www.carondelet.org/[/stextbox]

Solar Companies - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

The Fight To Lure Solar Companies To The Valley Is Fierce

The fight to lure solar energy companies to Arizona will be fierce in 2011, as states become more competitive in their efforts to land solar companies that are themselves battling for funding in a stagnant capital market.

“(This year) will be more competitive than 2010 because the states are feeling more pressure and the idea that we’ll emerge out of this recession soon is just falling out of people’s heads,” says Barry Broome, president of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, a major player in the efforts to bring solar and renewable energy companies to the Valley.

At least 10 renewable energy companies have located or announced plans to locate in Arizona since the state Legislature passed a tax-incentive program in 2009, Broome says. The most notable players are Chinese giant Suntech Power Holdings Co., the leading solar manufacturer in the world, and Power-One, which makes solar and wind inverter products.

Their arrival not only burnishes Arizona’s reputation as a potential leader in the effort to harness renewable energy, but also creates a burgeoning supply chain for solar energy manufacturers.

For example, United Kingdom-based FAIST GreenTek plans to open its first U.S. plant, a 56,000 SF facility in Phoenix, to provide metal steel containers for Power-One’s inverter boxes. Additionally, Spanish glass manufacturer Rioglass located to Arizona to provide materials for Abengoa’s Solana plant near Gila Bend, which is expected to be the largest concentrating solar energy power plant in the world.

“The tentacles that are caused by these companies will grow long over time,” says Eran Mahrer, director of renewable energy for Arizona Public Service, which will purchase the electricity generated at the Gila Bend site.

GPEC currently is working to lure two solar companies to the Valley, Broome says, adding, “I’m not saying we won’t see 10 companies again, but it’s much tougher. The industry is maturing and the capital markets haven’t recovered.”

He believes the market will see a roll up, or a decline in smaller, newer companies and will settle on fewer, major players.

The impact of solar companies on the commercial real estate market is significant. Solar-related companies gave a shot in the arm to Arizona’s persistently high industrial vacancy rates, says Pete Wentis, an industrial broker with CB Richard Ellis.

The second quarter of 2010 saw positive absorption in the industrial sector for the first time in a year and a half, Wentis says. By 4Q 2010, the market saw 4.4 MSF of positive absorption, which lowered the industrial vacancy rate in Maricopa County from 16.1% to 14.7%. Wentis estimates that solar companies contributed between 15% to 20% to that absorption.

The 14.7% vacancy rate means there is 40 MSF of industrial space available.

It is difficult to say whether there is enough available inventory for solar-related companies, as they don’t all require the same type of industrial space, Wentis says, adding that industrial is the most diversified of all the tenant types of space.

Solar proponents agree that Arizona is just starting to establish itself as a leader in the solar industry, but more needs to be done.

“Are we doing a good job? Yes,” Broome says. “Are we doing a great job? No. Could we be doing better? Yes.”

Factors that helped draw solar companies here and drive the production of solar generation include state tax incentives, utility incentives to customers for rooftop photovoltaic systems, a federal grant program that has been extended for one more year, and state renewable energy standards that require utilities to generate 15% of their kilowatt-hours sold from renewable sources by 2025.

Finally, the total installed cost of photovoltaics has dropped 40% in three years due to several factors, including better production, innovation, and the emergence of China into the market, says Nancy LaPlaca, a policy advisor and spokesperson for Arizona Corporation Commission commissioner Paul Newman.

Stable and well-thought-out energy policies would help the industry, Broome says, adding that the state has taken a “herky jerky” approach to renewable energy. A federal energy standard also would bring stability to the market, he adds.

The state also should discuss ways to export green energy, LaPlaca says. Currently, Arizona exports 30% of its electricity to California, but that is “brown” energy derived from coal, natural gas and nuclear.

For more information about GPEC and its efforts to bring solar companies to the Valley, visit gpec.org.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Neonatal Care Award

Cristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children's HospitalCristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. Cristina Carballo’s passion has always been neonatology. Her love for its patients and the subject drove her to develop the second Neuro/NICU program in the country at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Her dedication to develop an entire program that diagnoses and treats all neurologically affected neonates has saved many lives and given many babies a better chance at a quality life.

Carballo, who has been with the hospital since 1988, brought an innovative, cutting-edge treatment therapy to the Valley and implemented it at Phoenix Children’s — the first in the state and only the second in the country. With the treatment, Carballo is trying to prevent hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. It occurs when a baby suffers from lack of oxygen before or during birth. The lack of oxygen can cause disabilities such as dyslexia or cerebral palsy, or even death. Using hypothermia therapies, affected babies are cooled down, allowing physicians to conduct brain studies so they can direct the appropriate treatment. The therapy also decreases an infant’s risk of developing a disability.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]

Significant Infrastructure - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Centennial Series: Significant Infrastructure In Arizona History

AZRE’s Centennial Series for this issue focuses on 100 years of infrastructure.

Find out what is ranked as the most significant infrastructure in Arizona history:

INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM
Construction completed for the I-10: 1956-58, I-17: 1954, I-40: 1961-84

I-10: A major East-West interstate highway, it runs from California, enters Arizona, continues through Phoenix and Tucson and exits at the New Mexico border. I-17: It was the first freeway segment built in Phoenix. Although it does not go between states, it is the main freeway that takes people up to popular destinations in Northern Arizona, including the Grand Canyon.

PALO VERDE NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT
Construction began in 1976; it was commissioned in 1988.

Palo Verde is the largest nuclear generating facility in the U.S., averaging more than 3.2 gigawatts of electrical power. Located in Wintersburg (45 miles west of Phoenix), it serves 4M people. APS owns 29.1% the plant and also operates it.

COLORADO RIVER DAM SYSTEM: GLEN CANYON AND HOOVER DAMS
Glen Canyon: Construction began in 1956 and the dam opened in 1966.

Hoover: Constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression; it was dedicated on Sept. 30, 1935, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Glen Canyon: This dam is the second largest on the Colorado River at Page. Its main purpose includes generating electrical power, water storage and recreation activities. The dam generates an average of 451 megawatts, which contributes 6% of the total electricity generated in Arizona. The Colorado River caused the Glen Canyon, which lies to the north of the dam, to become flooded and has subsequently created the large reservoir called Lake Powell.  Hoover Dam: Once known as Boulder Dam, this concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River sits on the border between Arizona and Nevada. The dam’s generators provide power for public and private utilities in Nevada, Arizona and California.

CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT
Construction began in 1973 and new and modified dams built as part of the project were completed in 1994.

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is a 336-mile canal that diverts water from the Colorado River at Lake Havasu City into Central and Southern Arizona. It is the largest and most expensive aqueduct system ever built in the U.S.

PHOENIX SKY HARBOR INT’L AIRPORT
Sky Harbor has been operating under its current name prior to 1935, when it was purchased by the city of Phoenix. Terminal 1 was built in 1952.

Sky Harbor began serving American Airlines and Bonanza Air (Frontier Airlines) and TWA in the 1950s. Today Sky Harbor is the primary regional hub and Mexico gateway for Tempe-based US Airways, its largest operator. Both US Airways and Southwest Airlines  operate out of Sky Harbor’s Terminal 4, which handles about 80% of airport traffic.

ARIZONA’S MILITARY BASES
Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson: Established in 1935 as Davis-Monthan Landing Field; Luke AFB, Glendale: 1941; Williams AFB, Mesa (now Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport): Opened 1941 and closed in 1993.

D-M: The host unit at the base is the 355th Fighter Wing. It provides A-10 Thunderbolt II close-air support, which was crucial in the Gulf War. Luke: The 56th Fighter Wing (56 FW) is the host wing at Luke and is composed of four groups of 27 squadrons, including eight fighter squadrons. The base population includes about 7,000 military and civilian members and 15,000 family members. With about 80,000 retired military members living in Greater Phoenix, the base services a total population of more than 100,000. Williams: It was an active training base for the Army and the Air Force. Before closing in 1993, it was the leading pilot training center of the USAF, supplying 25% of its pilots. Since its closure it is now the civilian Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

ROOSEVELT LAKE AND DAM
Dedicated in March 1911 by President Theodore Roosevelt, for whom it was named.

This reservoir formed by Theodore Roosevelt Lake (now called Roosevelt Lake) and Roosevelt Dam on the Salt River is part of the Salt River Project (SRP). Located 80 miles northeast of Phoenix, the reservoir (created by a masonry dam) is the largest lake located entirely within the state of Arizona. Roosevelt Lake is a popular recreation destination within the Tonto National Forest. Roosevelt is the oldest of the six reservoirs constructed and operated by SRP. It also has the largest storage capacity of the SRP lakes, with the ability to store 1.6 M acre-feet of water.

METRO PHOENIX FREEWAY SYSTEM
Loop 101: 1988, completed in 2001 to the present; 202: 1990 to the present; State Route 51 (Piestewa Parkway): U.S. 60 (Superstition Freeway): Truck U.S. 60, 1966.

101: This semi-beltway encompasses much of Metro Phoenix and connects Valley suburbs, including Tolleson, Glendale, Peoria, Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe and Chandler. 202: This beltway encompasses the East Valley and navigates and surrounds Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, and Gilbert, making it very vital to the area freeway system. 51: This is the only new freeway to be built through central Phoenix other than I-10. It was renamed from Squaw Peak Parkway to Piestewa Freeway in honor of Lori Piestewa, who was killed in Iraq. 60: Like most of the East-West U.S. routes, 60 was cut short of its final destination by the I-10.

SUN CITY, ARIZONA
Construction began in the 1960s as a Del Webb community and was built on what was once the ghost town of Marinette.

The Sun City development established Arizona as a state for retirees. Little has changed for the community in the past 40 years. However, as more people retired to the area, Del Webb began construction on Sun City West in the late-1970s, Sun City Grand in the late-1990s, Sun City Anthem in 1999, and Sun City Festival in July 2006.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

AB's Top Lawyer's List, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

AB’s Top Lawyers List – Construction And Corporate Law

AB’s Top Lawyers List was compiled via a survey sent out to law firms throughout the Valley with strong practice areas affecting the business community. The firms were asked to pick their top attorneys in each category as determined by AB. All firms that responded to the survey are represented in this online directory.


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Categories

Alternative Dispute Resolution Intellectual Property
Banking International Trade and Finance Law
Bankruptcy Labor and Employment
Commercial Litigation Mediation
Construction Product Liability
Corporate Public Finance
Employee Benefits Real Estate
Environmental Tax
Franchise Trusts and Estates
Health Care White-Collar Criminal Defense
Immigration Workers’ Compensation
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CONSTRUCTION

CORPORATE

Bryan Cave

R. Neil Irwin
Partner
602-364-7110

Stanley Lutz
Counsel
602-364-7003

Buchalter Nemer

Jeffrey H. Levinson
Of Counsel
480-383-1800

Comitz | Beethe

Michael F. Beethe
Member
480-998-7800

Davis Miles

Mark E. Lassiter
Partner
480-344-4455

Gregory L. Miles
Partner
480-344-4575

Dioguardi Flynn

John P. Flynn
Partner
480-951-8800

DLA Piper

Mark A. Nadeau
Partner
480-606-5110

Engelman Berger

Scott W. Hulbert
Associate
602-271-9090

Fennemore Craig

John Randall Jefferies
Shareholder
602-916-5313

John E. Kofron
Shareholder
520-879-6814

Gallagher & Kennedy

Kevin O’Malley
Shareholder
602-530-8430

Thomas A. Maraz
Shareholder
602 530-8411

Galbut & Galbut

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Olivier Beabeau
Member
602-955-1455

Gammage & Burnham

Michael R. King
Partner
602-256-0566

Thomas J. McDonald
Partner
602-256-0566

Jeffrey J. Miller
Partner
602-256-0566

Richard K. Mahrle
Partner
602-256-0566

George U. Winney III
Partner
602-256-0566

Kevin J. Blakley
Partner
602-256-0566

Greenberg Traurig

E. Jeffrey Walsh
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

Wendy N. Weigand
Member
602-257-7410

Dean C. Robertson
Member
602-257-7454

John P. Robertson II
Member
602-257-7419

Jaburg|Wilk

Mark Bogard
Partner
602-248-1000

Neal Bookspan
Shareholder
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Keith F. Overholt
Partner
602-262-5837

James O. Ehinger
Partner
602-262-5943

John “Jack” Sestak Jr.
Partner
602-262-5827

Russell R. Rea
Partner
602-262-5849

Bruce B. May
Partner
602-262-5923

Lee E. Esch
Partner
602-262-5803

Lewis and Roca

Frances Haynes  
Partner
602-262-5710

Robert Roos
Partner
602-262-5779

Joe McGarry
Partner
602-262-5391

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

Richard Friedlander
Shareholder
602-285-5004

Stephen Richman
Shareholder
602-285-5017

Scott A. Holcomb
Shareholder
602-285-5028

Greg Cahill
Shareholder
602-285-5000

Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner

Randy Nussbaum
Shareholder
480-609-0011

Gregory P. Gillis
Shareholder
480-609-0011

Andrea H. Landeen
Shareholder
480-609-0011

Perkins Coie
Jodi Feuerhelm
Partner
602-351-8015

Polsinelli Shughart

Robert O. Dyer (Rob)
Shareholder
602-650-2049

Scott K. Henderson
Shareholder
602-650-2029

Robert G. Anderson (Bob)
Shareholder
602-650-2040

Wayne B. Ducharme
Of Counsel
602-650-2068

Quarles & Brady

Craig Kaufman
Partner
520-770-8707

Ed Salanga
Partner
602-229-5422

Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros

Denise J. Wachholz
Shareholder
602-256-3073

Rose Law Group

Brian Bergin
Partner
480-240-5634

Ryan Rapp & Underwood

John G. Ryan
Partner
602-280-1000

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

David Kash
Shareholder
602-440-4837

Sean Hood
Shareholder
602-440-4849

Sacks Tierney

Sharon B. Shively
Shareholder
480-425-2625

David C. Tierney
Shareholder
480-425-2620

Steven R. Beeghley
Shareholder
480-425-2686

Julianne C. Wheeler
Shareholder
480-425-2610

Sanders & Parks

Mark G. Worischeck
Managing Shareholder
602-532-579

Sherman & Howard

Arthur W. Pederson
Member
480-624-2704

Nathaniel B. Rose
Counsel
602-240-3041

Peter N. Spiller
Member
602-240-3020

Snell & Wilmer

James J. Sienicki
Partner
602-382-6351

Jason Ebe
Partner
602-382-6240

Ronald W. Messerly
Partner
602-382-6251

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

K. David Lindner
Partner
602-528-4050

Norman C. Storey
Partner
602-528.4020

David W. Kreutzberg
Partner
602-528-4062

Justin Steltenpohl
Partner
602-528-4192

Brian M. McQuaid
Partner
602-528-4175

Eliot L. Kaplan
Partner
602-528-4036

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Jeffrey J. Goulder
Partner
602-212-8531

Tiffany & Bosco

William J. Simon
Shareholder
602-255-6004


















































.

Ballard Spahr

Karen C. McConnell
Partner
602-798-5403

Adrienne W. Wilhoit
Partner
602-798-5414

Stephen M. Savage
Managing Partner
602-798-5469

Kurt C. Donnell
Associate
602-798-5459

Bryan Cave

David Beauchamp
Partner
602-364-7060

R. Neil Irwin
Partner
602-364-7110

Buchalter Nemer

William J. Gelm
Shareholder
480-383-1800

Steven M. Fox
Shareholder
480-383-1800

Davis Miles

Timothy D. Ronan
Partner
480-344-4068

Charles E. Davis
Partner
480-344-4570

Dioguardi Flynn

Mark Dioguardi
Partner
480-951-8800

John P. Flynn
Partner
480-951-8800

Peter J. Moolenaar
Partner
480-951-8800

DLA Piper

Steven D. Pidgeon
Co-Managing Partner, Phoenix Office
480-606-5124

Gregory R. Hall
Partner
480-606-5128

David P. Lewis
Partner
480-606-5126

Fennemore Craig

Stephen A. Good
Shareholder
602-916-5395

Anne L. Kleindienst
Shareholder
602-916-5392

Paul A. Krulisky
Shareholder
602-916-5330

Sarah A. Strunk
Shareholder
602-916-5327

Susan M. Wissink
Shareholder
602-916-5319

Gallagher & Kennedy

Terence W. Thompson
Shareholder
602-530-8515

Steven T. Lawrence
Shareholder
602 530-8077

Galbut & Galbut

Keith R. Galbut
President
602-955-1455

Charles Morrow
Associate
602-955-1455

Gammage & Burnham

Thomas J. McDonald
Partner
602-256-0566

Kevin R. Merritt
Partner
602-256-0566

Jeffrey J. Miller
Partner
602-256-0566

Michael R. King
Partner
602-256-0566

Christopher A. Womack
Partner
602-256-0566

Timothy J. Martens
Partner
602-256-0566

James F. Polese
Partner
602-256-0566

Patricia E. Nolan
Partner
602-256-0566

David L. Johnson
Partner
602-256-0566

Michael C. Gillette
Associate
602-256-0566

Jonathan A. Bennett
Associate
602-256-0566

Greenberg Traurig

Robert S. Kant
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Bruce E. Macdonough
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Quinn P. Williams
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Jean E. Harris
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Brian H. Blaney
Shareholder
602-445-8000

Gust Rosenfeld

John L. Hay
Member
602-257-7468

Christina M. Noyes
Member
602-257-7488

Tom Chauncey II
Member
602-257-7479

Jaburg|Wilk

Beth Cohn
Shareholder
602-248-1000

Susan Wells
Partner
602-248-1000

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon

Richard Lieberman
Partner
602-262-5935

Jack N. Rudel
Partner
602-262-5951

George C. Spilsbury
Partner
602-262-5885

Wayne A. Smith
Partner
602-262-5953

Lewis and Roca

Scott DeWald
Partner
602-262-5333

Tom Morgan
Partner
602-262-5712

David Manch
Partner
602-262-5397

Mariscal, Weeks, McIntyre & Friedlander

David Thompson
Shareholder
602-285-5021

Osborn Maledon

Tom Curzon
Member
602-640-9308

William Hardin
Member
602-640-9322

Perkins Coie

Judy Weiss
Partner
602-351-8240

Raj Gangadean
Partner
602-351-8452

Polsinelli Shughart

Brian Moll
Shareholder
602-650-2302

Michael F. Patterson
Shareholder
602-650-2038

Charles R. Berry (Charlie)
Shareholder
602-650-2030

Phil Guttilla
Shareholder
602-650-2327

Nancy E. Pisaruk
Of Counsel
602-650-2026

Quarles & Brady

P. Robert Moya
Partner
602-230-5580

Steve Emerick
Partner
602-230-5517

Chris Hoffman
Partner
602-229-5336

Geoff Ossias
Of Counsel
602-229-5231

Jacque Westling
Partner
602-229-5513

Rose Law Group

Mike Smalley
Partner
480-505-3935

Ann-Marie Anderson
Associate
480-240-5643

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Jim Brophy
Shareholder
602-440-4807

Tara Pauls
Associate
602-440-4839

Sacks Tierney

Michael R. Rooney
Shareholder
480-425-2604

Seymour Sacks
Shareholder
480-425-2688

Steven M. Goldstein
Shareholder
480-425-2613

Sanders & Parks

Rick Bryson
Senior Shareholder
602-532-5710

Sherman & Howard

John M. Randolph
Member
602-240-3030

Daniel P. Beeks
Counsel
602-240-3058

Maureen Anders
Member
602-240-3029

Snell & Wilmer

Matthew P. Feeney
Partner
602-382-6239

Michael M. Donahey
Partner
602-382-6381

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

Christopher D. Johnson
Partner
602-528-4046

Frank M. Placenti
Partner
602-528-4004

John Welch
Partner
602-528-4940

Joseph Crabb
Partner
602-528-4084

Joseph P. Richardson
Partner
602-528-4801

K. David Lindner
Partner
602-528-4050

Justin Steltenpohl
Partner
602-528-4192

Norman C. Storey
Partner
602-528-4020

Eliot L. Kaplan
Partner
602-528-4036

Steptoe & Johnson

Kevin L. Olson
Partner
602-257-5275

Nancy L. White
Partner
602-257-5213

Kevin G. Hunter
Partner
602-257-5203

Stinson Morrison Hecker

Jeffrey A. Ekbom
Partner
602-212-8524

Karen L. Liepmann
Partner
602-212-8532

Tiffany & Bosco

William H. Finnegan
Shareholder
602-255-6009

Robert A. Royal
Shareholder
602-255-6011

James P. O’Sullivan
Shareholder
602-255-6017

David L. Case
Shareholder
602-255-6097

Peter Madrid, AZRE Associate Editor - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Editor's Letter: A Glimpse of Arizona's Past, Present, Future

Think of this issue of AZRE Magazine as a kind of time machine. Within its pages, we offer a glimpse of Arizona’s past, present and future in its’ commercial real estate industry.

We launch our coverage of Arizona’s Centennial celebration with the theme “Rising from the Desert: 100 Years of Infrastructure.” We rank the top 10 projects that have served the people of this state; projects that also informed the rest of the nation that Arizona was open for business. No. 1 on our list? Here’s a hint: “Get Your Kicks …”

AZRE March/April 2011The present is represented by our 6th Annual RED Awards, in which we recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects and the construction teams involved. It was my first exposure to these prestigious honors, and I was very impressed with the many incredible nominations.

Finally, this issue examines the future of the industry with our 2011 Annual Real Estate Outlook. We consulted with experts in the various sectors and hopefully have prepared a concise report. A few things we learned: Business attraction and job growth must improve, and Arizona must be a leader in the clean and renewable energy revolution.

Peter Madrid
Associate Editor
(602) 424-8844
peter.madrid@azbigmedia.com
Twitter: @Peter_Madrid

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

El Rio Community Health Center - AZRE March/April 2011

Medical: El Rio Community Health Center, El Pueblo


EL RIO COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER: EL PUEBLO

Developer: N/A
Contractor: BFL Construction Company
Architect: CDG Architects
Size: 26,998 SF
Location: 101 W. Irvington Rd., Tucson

The $5M, 2-story medical office building includes 48 exam rooms, a full-service pharmacy and radiology and lab facilities. The project is pursuing LEED certification.

AZRE March/April 2011
Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Surgeon

Honoree: David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children’s Neuroscience, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

David Adelson, Medical Director, Children's Neuroscience, Phoenix Children's HospitalAs director of the Children’s Neuroscience Institute (CNI) at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Dr. David Adelson’s day-to-day responsibilities are mainly clinical and include patient visits and surgeries. Adelson, however, also teaches medical students on a daily basis and lectures and teaches regularly around the U.S. and in other countries.

An internationally recognized neurosurgical and neuroscience expert specializing in head injury and epilepsy in children, Adelson was chosen to head the CNI at Phoenix Children’s in April 2009. He is also the division chief of neurosurgery at PCH. At the hospital and at the CNI, Adelson sees a variety of patients and performs numerous surgeries.

Adelson manages a staff of more than 50 medical professionals including neurosurgeons, neurologists, psychologists, neuro-psychologists, psychiatrists, research staff, research coordinators, research operation people, grant writers, a data coordinator, a statistician, nurse practitioners, administrators (clerical) and managers. In addition to his many duties, Adelson also is involved in numerous research projects, including researching oxidative lipidomics in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]



Scott Petersen, Director of Trauma Services, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical CenterFinalist: Scott Petersen, MD, FACS, Director of Trauma Services, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Dr. Scott Petersen oversees the Valley’s busiest Level 1 Trauma Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, which cares for approximately 700 patients per year with the most critical injuries, as well as managing and training 10 trauma surgeons. Aside from his impressive credentials, however, his expertise remains at the bedside in trauma, acute care surgery and critical care. He continues to be an advocate and leader for trauma patients at the city, state and national level.

While being an active leader and teacher at St. Joseph’s, Petersen also is a clinical professor of surgery at Creighton University Medical School, the Mayo Clinic and the University of Arizona.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.stjosephs-phx.org[/stextbox]

Construction Projects, AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

CRE Industry Gains Momentum Thanks To New Construction Projects

As 2010 ended, Arizona’s commercial real estate industry gained some much-needed momentum entering the new year, thanks to a slew of new construction projects just completed or scheduled for completion in 2011.

The much-anticipated opening of CityScape signaled a resurgence for Downtown Phoenix, and as the year ended, it boasted a 90% occupancy rate. Rising in the shadow of CityScape is the new Maricopa County Superior Court Tower, scheduled to open later this year.

Elsewhere, Fountainhead Office Plaza in Tempe (439,070 SF); Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert (130,000 SF); and the new FBI building in Phoenix (210,000 SF) are scheduled for completion this year. The new spring training facility in Scottsdale for the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies opened in February.

Although a few new high-rise offices buildings, a hospital and a federal building won’t cure the industry’s ills, still, there is optimism in 2011 that the markets will pick up. The keys, according to experts are business attraction, quality jobs and the loosening of capital.

“I’m really bullish on this year that equity is coming back,” says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. “If Arizona shows growth in the third and fourth quarters, it could be a great year for jobs. Once capital frees up, we can start going somewhere.”

Adds Barry Albrecht, CEO of the Central Arizona Regional Economic Development Foundation: “Once the lending marketplace returns to funding 75% projects, we will see new construction respond. When state leadership designs a meaningful and competitive tax base, existing Arizona companies will expand and occupy available properties.

Additionally, once the Arizona Commerce Authority develops incentive programs that compete with other states’ programs, we will see business attraction. When we, as a state, create a competitive operating environment for industry to prosper, we will see a commercial real estate recovery.”

Here’s the outlook for 2011 from industry experts:

ECONOMY

“By far the biggest influence on current conditions is the status of the national economy. The Arizona economy will improve as the U.S. economy improves and as people continue to get their financial houses in order. Even without action, Arizona will again lead the nation in growth before mid-decade. However, we want to create more than lower value added jobs in retail and real estate. We want to expand our deteriorated economic base with higher value added jobs and industries. Arizona no longer makes anything of higher value. This is critical to not only grow, but to grow well. While conditions will continue to improve in commercial real estate, Arizona is still two to three years away from normal vacancy rates. The good news though, things are not getting any worse and expect improvement in 2011 and 2012.

John Lenio, economist & managing director, CB Richard Ellis Economic Incentives Group
cbre.com

“Employment will drive the business expansion needed to create material positive absorption in the office markets and reduce existing supply (vacancy) and eventually have upward pressure on rents (both critical elements to increasing asset values). These newly created jobs will add disposable income to the local economy and will drive sales activity in both residential housing and disposable products. The retail industry will get the much needed boost in increased spending via this new addition to disposable income, which will in turn drive demand for retail space, reduce existing supply and increase rents and eventually asset values.”

Scott Holland, partner, Keystone Commercial Capital
keystonecommercialcapital.com

“2010 was our year for healing. 2011 will be our transition year. We’re moving in to full recovery mode. Our development cycle officially ended in 2010, which means that the landscape of our commercial market and inventory will, by-and-large, remain static the next two, three, even four years.”

Don Mudd, managing director, Jones Lang LaSalle
us.am.joneslanglasalle.com

INDUSTRIAL

“What’s not being talked about nationally is that Phoenix is a preferred strategic location for value-add industrial employers. Last year, the Phoenix industrial market topped 4 MSF of absorption. That puts us in at least the top five — and possibly higher — of all U.S. markets. We may even have a shortage of larger space beginning as early as the end of this year. Mid-size clients typically have two or three dozen options to choose from at very soft pricing, but larger clients are having a harder time. In December, for example, we had an industrial client looking for 500,000 to 630,000 SF and only had three possible local solutions. In the same time period, we had a client looking for 250,000 SF of industrial space and had nine solutions Valleywide.”

Tony Lydon, managing director, Jones Lang LaSalle
us.am.joneslanglasalle.com

OFFICE & RETAIL

“There still exists an over-supply of space in office and retail. The existing inventories will take several years to absorb prior to any major new development taking place. During any down real estate cycle, tenants take advantage of the ability to move up in class. We have seen that happen locally, which has had some effect on the Class A product. As things begin to gain momentum, we will experience a shortage of Class A product in core areas, which then leads to rental growth and eventually allows new development to once again be warranted. Multi-family is still a strong sector due to the economic downturn forcing many home owners out of their homes and into the rental market.”

Kurt Rosene, senior vice president, The Alter Group
altergroup.com

ARCHITECTURE

“The industry will begin to see a slow but steady climb out of the recession. Most of us have been bouncing along the bottom with good and not-so-good months. The thaw has begun for owners with capital and they are ready to enter the market cautiously. Deals on real estate are prevalent and owners are beginning to take advantage, which is great for architects.

“Lending will continue to be difficult, therefore cash is critical to any new project. Architects should be cautious and assess the level of risk when a project is dependent on bank financing.

“Medical facilities are still being developed due to aging baby boomers in tandem with technological advances. Physical facilities will either require renovations to accommodate the new technology or additions to accommodate the older population.

“Retail will be the last market to recover and will see a very slow start. There will be a balancing act between keeping rent rates low for recovering tenants and keeping retail centers attractive to tenants and visitors alike.”

Jill Hamblen, AIA, triARC Architecture & Design
triARCdesign.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

“2011 is shaping up to be another year of great challenge to the commercial real estate industry. A sampling of BOMA Greater Phoenix property managers gave similar results to 2010. Some of their concerns:

“Vacancy rates are high, and competition for available tenants is serious. Deals are all over the map, and it is essential to make a building stand out in the market in order to be able to justify a lease at or above break-even. Keeping a building in Class A condition with the budget constraints from owners and lenders is extremely difficult. Negotiating with current vendors to lower contract costs and rebidding when contracts come up is absolutely essential.

“Banks are not working with owner on market rate and/or tenant improvement allowances as they have historically. Tenants’ businesses are vulnerable to market swings. Many tenants are asking for rent relief or not paying as they should, as well as just defaulting. This is another challenge that owners and managers need to work together to meet.
“Smart, energetic management is always important, but under current conditions is critical. A manager will need all of the tools available, and the knowledge to use them well, to successfully meet the new year.

Mark Covington, executive director, BOMA Greater Phoenix
www.bomaphoenix.org

TUCSON MARKET

There is also some momentum in the Tucson market entering 2011 as construction projects include the UniSource Energy Corporate Headquarters (200,000 SF) and a new FBI building (84,353 SF).

In the office market, Tucson experienced a slight, but noticeable, uptick in lease activity at year-end, largely attributed to a more pro-business sentiment and the extension of tax cuts, according to PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services. Following a 25% to 40% drop in rents since the market peak, landlords have been more creative in length of lease and structure of concessions. Renewal activity has, accordingly, been very high.

Office building sales activity remained low by historic standards, as 75% of 2010 sales were to users. The overall volume for 2010 totaled just 628,000 SF. The outlook for 2011 appears to mirror 2010. Expect similar activity and slightly negative absorption.

The Tucson industrial market showed a slow recovery, with positive absorption advancing at a very slow pace. Companies that delayed expansions and relocations during the past two years are now moving forward, however, this activity is limited. Rents are continuing to decline, according to PICOR, although many property owners are reluctant to recognize this and are losing deals as a result.

Land sales were at a standstill in 2010, with no demand for new construction. Lender requirements and restrictions stifled the sale of leased investments as well, and few owners wanted to sell into the current environment. It is likely to be an uneventful year in 2011, with the local economy limping along toward recovery.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Legacy Design Build Remodeling - Scottsdale Living March/April 2011

Legacy Design Build Remodeling Is Keeping Busy, Despite The Weak Economy

It wasn’t that long ago that million-dollar homes kept Michael Daniel and his company, Legacy Design Build Remodeling, fairly busy. However, the market for luxury home remodeling is slowing, and attitudes toward spending disposable income are changing. Still, that doesn’t mean the industry is disappearing.

For Legacy Design Build Remodeling, a company known for its million-dollar projects, the game has changed with significantly fewer high-end requests. Legacy Design Build Remodeling, however, has adapted its business model and is moving forward.

With the market more competitive than ever and trade suppliers reducing their prices to stay in business — in turn lowering the costs of remodeling projects — Legacy Design Build Remodeling is putting the budgets of its clients first and then adjusting the project accordingly.

“Two years ago, clients put more thought into what they wanted, figured out everything they wanted to do, and then figured out the cost,” says Daniel, president of Legacy Design Build Remodeling. “Now, the cost comes first. Clients won’t make the sacrifice, and we have to present a more basic, budget-minded, targeted project.”

Although there are fewer million-dollar remodeling projects, Legacy Design Build Remodeling continues to receive a growing number of requests for smaller, more budget-minded jobs, especially kitchens and bathrooms.

“Clients say, ‘Take what I have, and do what you can for less,’ ” Daniel says. “No one is nearly as willing to break down walls or make additions.”

But this doesn’t faze Daniel and his business. He takes pride in these smaller projects, some of which have won local and regional awards, including four National Association of the Remodeling Industry’s Contractor of the Year awards.

“We are more proud of the smaller projects because more creativity, design and thought goes behind them,” Daniel says. “… we want to emphasize that our projects range from $5,000 to million-dollar projects; we aren’t just a high-end company that will only take on the more expensive renovations.”

For more information about Legacy Design Build Remodeling, visit legacyaz.com or call (480) 991.1993.

 

Native American Cultural Center, AZRE March/April 2011

Public: Native American Cultural Center

NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER

Developer: Northern Arizona University
Design Builder: Brignall Construction
Architect: Studio Ma
Size: 12,000 SF
Location: Knoles/McCrearey Dr., Flagstaff

The $4.85M Native American cultural center will be housed at NAU’s North Campus. It will include large gathering rooms, student meeting rooms, director and graduate offices, student lounge areas and conference rooms. Subcontractors include Midstate Mechanical, JF Ellis, SEACON Electric, Skyce Steel, Bold Framing, Ignace Brothers and Kinney Construction Services. Expected completion is 3Q 2011.

AZRE March/April 2011
Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Manager

Honoree: Martha Martinez, Manager of Interpreters Program, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Martha Martinez, Manager of Interpreters Program, Maricopa Integrated Health SystemMartha Martinez has accomplished many things since immigrating to the U.S. two decades ago from Mexico. Five years after moving to the U.S., Martinez began working the night shift as a housekeeper at Maricopa Medical Center. This way she could enroll in ESL (English as a second language) classes during the day. As her English steadily improved, doctors and nurses would ask Martinez to provide translations for Spanish-speaking patients. Martinez gladly volunteered her services. Later, when Maricopa developed a formal interpreters’ program, Martinez joined its pilot program. Now, Martinez is the language services supervisor and manager of the interpreters program for Maricopa Integrated Health System (MIHS).

Martinez manages a staff of 22 interpreters who are fluent in six languages, including Spanish, Somali, Burmese and Swahili. She also is often asked to translate complex medical papers for the center. Her work encourages safety and confidence toward the hospital, while also improving communication between caregivers and patients. In fact, in 1997 Martinez earned her certification in pre-natal education when she discovered there was a critical lack of such knowledge available to Spanish-speaking mothers.

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Nathan Lewis, Pre-Hospital Coordinator, Banner Del E. Webb Medical CenterFinalist: Nathan Lewis, Pre-Hospital Coordinator, Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center

As pre-hospital coordinator for Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center, Nathan Lewis is constantly working to improve the hospital’s relationships with emergency responders and the quality of care the emergency department and the responders provide.
Lewis is responsible for interacting with crews, fielding a scope of practice questions and following up with patient outcomes under the Quality Assistance process. Along with his other duties, Lewis pioneered Project Lifenet, a partnership with the Surprise Fire Department, to create a 12-lead digital field EKG. With Lifenet, diagnostic quality digital EKGs can be transmitted from the field to computers and smart phones.

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Jean Revard, Director of Food/Environmental Services, Paradise Valley HospitalFinalist: Jean Revard, Director of Food/Environmental Services, Paradise Valley Hospital

A 25-year veteran of the health care food management industry, Jean Revard currently works as director of food and environmental services at Paradise Valley Hospital. She manages a staff of 37 people and oversees many diverse aspects of the hospital’s operations, from food preparation for patients to checking that all patient rooms and hospital areas are adequately maintained.

As co-chair of Paradise Valley Hospital’s Good to Great program, Revard facilitates a team of hospital leaders who identify different problems within the hospital, brainstorm creative solutions and then work on turning those plans into a reality. Her work has garnered Revard the respect of her colleagues.

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