Tag Archives: president

Mayor Rogers-web

Avondale mayor named NLC president

The mayor of Avondale has been named as the leader of the National League of Cities.

The NLC made the announcement Saturday that Mayor Marie Lopez Rogers would be the organization’s president for 2013.

Rogers says she is deeply honored to be elected to the one-year position.

The vote on a new president came at the end of the NLC’s annual Congress of Cities and Exposition in Boston.

The Arizona native grew up picking cotton alongside her parents, who were migrant farm workers. She was a social worker and city councilwoman before being elected mayor in 2006.

Officers in the NLC are charged with directing the organization’s advocacy and membership activities for the coming year.

Business Of Running For President

The Business Of Running For President

Much like running a corporation, running for president is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking. Just like a corporation, a campaign involves employees, money management, public relations, advertising and the selling of a product or service. Which in this case is the person running for office. In this graphic, we take a look at just what all it takes to run for president, and how big of a business doing so has become.

Like all businesses, you have better success in some states than others. Below is a look at how effective each candidate has been state by state in fundraising.

  • Overall Fundraising: Obama has raised $556M and Romney $340M.
  • State-by-State Breakdown:  A few examples…
    • NY: $11.2M Obama vs. $8.9M Romney
    • Ohio: $.8M Romney vs. $.6M Obama
    • CA: $68.3M Obama vs. $33.8M Romney
    • FL: $24.8M Romney vs. $16.9M Obama
  • Average Contribution: Romney has raised $170M from those contributing $2,000 or more vs. Obama who raised nearly half of that from larger donors at $92M.  See the graph for the entire breakdown!
  • Rising Influence of Super PACs: RNC has raised $273M from Super PACs vs. DNC which raised $70M.  This has dramatically impacted the race as they need no involvement from the candidates themselves.
  • Breakdown of how they spend their funds: Obama spent 51% on advertising vs. Romney 45%.  See breakdown by payroll, travel, polling, etc.
  • History of Presidential Campaign Costs: Lincoln spent just $2.8M in 1860; Reagan and Carter spent approx. $300M, see breakdown of major campaigns from history.

Business Of Running For President

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Infographic Credits, courtesy of Best Degree Programs:

Source: Bestdegreeprograms.org

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education.business

Penley Appointed President of Thunderbird

The Board of Trustees announced that Larry E. Penley, Ph.D., has been elected president and chief academic officer of Thunderbird School of Global Management effective Thursday, November 1, 2012. The appointment  follows a search that attracted top-tier candidates from both business and academic organizations.

Dr. Penley’s record of results over a distinguished 35-year career makes him a great leader for Thunderbird. As president of Colorado State University, he reversed declining enrollment and oversaw the doubling of fundraising. As dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, Dr. Penley led the creation of a strategic plan that produced a top 25 ranking among public MBA programs.

Dr. Penley also applied his learnings for diplomacy and management skills as chairman of The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), a world leader in accreditation services. INROADS Arizona and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council have honored Dr. Penley for his service.

As a leader, Dr. Penley’s extensive overseas experience gives him great passion for Thunderbird’s global mission. He has lectured on four continents, speaks Spanish, and has held faculty and administrative roles in Mexico and Venezuela. While at ASU, he also oversaw the launch of successful MBA programs in Chinaand Mexico.

“Thunderbird is very fortunate to have Dr. Penley at the helm,” said Ann Iverson, Chair of Thunderbird’s Board of Trustees. “He is a lifelong learner who embraces innovation, fosters collaboration, and welcomes diverse viewpoints.”

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GPEC honors Maracay Homes’ president, House Speaker

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) honored Arizona House Speaker Andy Tobin and GPEC Board Director Andy Warren, president of Maracay Homes, at its annual dinner.

Speaker Tobin was awarded GPEC’s Outstanding Regional Contribution award for his successful legislative efforts to help increase Arizona’s economic competitiveness, particularly with this year’s passage and enactment of HB2815, the Qualified Facilities Tax Credit and 2011’s HB2001, the Arizona Competitiveness Package. HB2815 expanded the Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program to other export-based manufacturers and lowered long-term capital gains taxes. HB2001 created the Quality Jobs Program, reduced corporate income taxes and increased the state’s Research and Development tax credit, among many other accomplishments.

“Speaker Tobin moved the ball forward enormously with the Qualified Facilities Tax Credit, which single-handedly raised Arizona’s competitiveness ranking from last to fourth,” said GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome. “This $630 million program is the most aggressive investment tax credit in the country – a game-changer for the region’s economic development prospects. I’m very grateful to Speaker Tobin for his leadership both at the legislature and within the economic development community.”

Warren received the Distinguished Service Award for his leadership in spearheading GPEC’s resource development efforts, including a new focus on multi-year commitments. He was successful in securing 50 percent of private investments for the next three-to-five years, helping to ensure a continued sustainability with GPEC’s key strategic initiatives in the international, science, technology and innovation sectors.

“In the span of just a few years, Andy has catapulted from a Valley newcomer to an exemplary community leader,” Broome said. “His work on GPEC’s resource development efforts has been successful largely because of his enthusiasm and commitment to the work we do diversifying the region’s economy and creating sustainable job growth.”

The dinner, GPEC’s premier annual event, celebrated GPEC’s success in the 2012 fiscal year, including a new record of 36 companies expanding or relocating to the region – the most ever in the organization’s 23-year history. This exceeds last year’s record-breaking 31
companies, making fiscal years 2011 and 2012 the best two years in terms of companies assisted since GPEC’s inception. This year’s dinner was sold out with an all-time high attendance of nearly 600.

“GPEC is proud to recognize Speaker Tobin and Andy Warren as two extraordinary leaders in the Greater Phoenix community,” said Jim Lundy, CEO of Alliance Bank of Arizona and GPEC’s new board chairman. “Both men have done tremendous jobs to cultivate economic growth and further GPEC’s mission and we are proud to celebrate their achievements.”
For more details about GPEC’s successes in FY12, visit www.gpecannualreport2012.com.

WEB - Mobile Mini - 2012-12

Mobile Mini CEO Bunger stepping down

Mobile Mini says Chairman, President and CEO Steven Bunger will step down from those posts at the end of the year.

Lead independent director Michael Watts will become chairman once Bunger departs. Watts has served as a board member since 2002 and became lead director in 2005.

The company, which sells and rents moving and storage units and mobile offices, said Tuesday that it has created a search committee to help find Bunger’s successor as CEO, with both internal and external candidates being considered.

Bunger has worked at Mobile Mini since 1983 and served in various roles. He became president and CEO in 1997 and became chairman in 2001.

Heidrick & Struggles has been hired to assist with the search process for a new CEO.

Mobile Mini Inc., which is based in Tempe, Ariz., says a new CEO is expected to be in place when Bunger departs or shortly after that.

Bunger said in a statement that he will help the new CEO over several months to ensure a smooth transition.

Shares of Mobile Mini rose 7 cents to $17.40 in afternoon trading. Its shares have traded in a range of $12.60 in late June to $23.08 in late February.

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Insight Names Dodenhoff as President

Insight Enterprises, Inc. (Nasdaq:NSIT), a leading worldwide technology provider of hardware, software and service solutions, announced today that Steve Dodenhoff has been named president, Insight United States. Dodenhoff will report directly to Ken Lamneck, president and chief executive officer, Insight Enterprises.

In this new role, Dodenhoff will lead all aspects of the U.S. business, including sales, marketing, operations, services and profitability.

“As we continue to strive for growth and operational excellence globally, it is important that we remain focused and aligned with our partners and clients in the U.S.,” said Lamneck. “Steve has demonstrated an exceptional ability to build relationships while maintaining trust and transparency. His collaboration with the senior leadership team has already led to significant contributions to our business strategy. Steve’s background and experience complements our team and aligns to our key growth initiatives.”

Dodenhoff joined Insight in January this year as the senior vice president of human resources and business development. With over 20 years of experience in building and leading growth-oriented technology companies, he has brought a wealth of sales, service delivery and talent development skill to Insight. Before joining Insight, Dodenhoff was president of Enghouse Interactive and held senior leadership roles with Integrated Information Systems and MicroAge.

“It’s an exciting time in our industry and our clients are increasingly looking to Insight to provide the consulting, implementation and managed services that complement our world class IT product and software sales capabilities,” said Dodenhoff. “I look forward to building on the strong foundation in place with our teammates and our partners and ensuring we are well positioned to meet our client’s IT solutions needs going forward. “

The move  is effective immediately. Dodenhoff is based at Insight’s headquarters in Tempe.

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Lori Singleton ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Lori Singleton, Salt River Project (SRP)

Lori Singleton, SRP

Lori Singleton is the manager of sustainability initiatives and technologies at Salt River Project. She is a 29-year employee of SRP and 40-year resident of Arizona. She is responsible for design and implementation of SRP’s environmental outreach programs with special focus on renewable energy.

Lori’s responsibilities at SRP include development and implementation of renewable energy projects to meet SRP’s sustainable resource goals. Singleton oversees research and development projects to support company-wide initiatives for SRP including gasoline lawn mower recycling, tree planting, clean school bus initiative, travel reduction and other internal environmental programs.

She works on development and implementation of the “green” energy pricing program, solar incentive program for residential and commercial customers and renewable energy education programs for implementation in middle school and high school curricula.

In addition, she does promotion and public relations for all new renewable energy projects and purchases (solar, wind, geothermal, landfill gas, low head hydro, fuel cells) while serving as the environmental issues media spokesperson for SRP and being a constant representative of SRP on numerous environmental committees, boards and commissions.

She was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve on the Solar Energy Advisory Council and also has several other current affiliations including: Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors; Audubon Society, chair, Board of Directors; Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, chair; Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President & National Board Director; Southwest Center for Education; and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of Directors.

Current Affiliations

Solar Energy Advisory Council, appointment by Governor Janet Napolitano
Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors
Audubon Society, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, Chair
Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President &
National Board Director
Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of
Directors

Affiliations (Past)

Valley Forward Association, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force
City of Phoenix, Environmental Quality Commission
Valley Metro, Clean Air Advisory Committee
Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Environmental Committee
Valley of the Sun United Way Loaned Executive


Topic: How people & organizations can get involved in the green movement from an energy perspective.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



 

Rommie Flammer President and CEO China Mist Tea Brands - AZ - Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

China Mist’s Rommie Flammer Talks About Her First Job

Rommie Flammer
Title: President and CEO
Company: China Mist Tea Brands

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
At 12 years old, a friend and I got together a bucket, soap and a sponge, then went door to door asking if we could wash our neighbors’ cars. When they would ask “how much,” we would say “whatever you want to pay us.” I quickly learned my first business lesson, which is have an idea of what your service is worth before heading out. This job was short lived after we knocked on the door of Vern and Claudia Lipp, who bred and showed Himalayan cats. When we asked if we could wash her car she replied, “No, but I have a bunch of litter boxes that need cleaning and cats that need grooming.” …  For the next three years I cleaned and groomed cats, a job that could have definitely earned a spot on the Discovery Channel’s “Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe!”

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first industry job was at China Mist right around the time I turned 16 years old. Over the course of 26 years, I have learned an incredible number of lessons and I still learn something everyday. … The most important lesson is to surround yourself with truly great people because your team is your greatest asset. Average employees don’t last long at China Mist. Next, is to always challenge the norms of your industry. … Indeed, it is the people who continually strive for a better product, better process, etc., who set themselves and their companies apart from the rest. Finally, focus on what you do best.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
When I started at China Mist, I earned minimum wage, which was around $3.35 per hour at the time. I cannot recall my hourly wage at Hotlipps Cattery, but the memories are priceless.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
I have had many mentors along the way, but would have to say that Mignon Latimer has been the biggest in my career. Mignon is the wife of a consultant hired by China Mist some years ago. I was an 18-year-old general manager at the time I started working with her. She taught me how to read and interpret financial details important to the company and precisely why they mattered. She gave me a truly sound financial base from which to build.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
While the barrier to entry is quite low, the competition is strong, so be sure you have a strong point of differentiation.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?

I really cannot imagine doing anything else, but if I had to pick a new industry it would be something in real estate.

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Merl Waschler

Merl Waschler’s First Job

Merle Waschler
President and CEO, Valley of the Sun United Way

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
As a young adult in high school and my early college years, I worked at Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in my hometown state of New Jersey. I consider my time at Greystone to be one of those pivotal life-shaping experiences. As an orderly and camp counselor, I worked serving the needs of mentally ill adults and children from all walks of life. Here I learned the power of empathy, patience and the true meaning of human potential. These virtues continue to shape my life and career daily.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it?
Upon graduating from Penn State University, I began my finance and accounting career at Arthur Andersen. Throughout my tenure at the firm, I sharpened my skills in business management and developed a business approach to accounting. I continue to utilize the financial management, operations and strong business ethics I learned early in my career at Arthur Andersen. I am genuinely grateful that my first industry job led me to a strong relationship with United Way. During my career at the firm, I served as a United Way loaned executive. As such, I worked alongside United Way staff helping to increase the understanding human service needs, and encouraged donations to the annual fundraising campaign. This journey has come full circle for me, as loaned executives are tremendous support to Valley of the Sun United Way.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I made minimum wage at Greystone Park (around $3.25 an hour) and earned about $10,300 a year at Arthur Andersen.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
My career and professional mentorship hit its pinnacle as Valley of the Sun United Way’s president. I am fortunate to have the counsel of leaders that span diverse industries, leadership levels and areas of expertise. As a leadership group, I look to corporate CEOs, nonprofit leaders, community philanthropists and many others for advice on pressing issues in the areas of education, income and health to guide Valley of the Sun United Way’s work. Equally important is the community’s voice to ensure pressing human care needs continue to be met. This wide-range community perspective is powerful and reflects a desire from all to create opportunities for a better tomorrow.

I continue to be inspired by my professional and community mentors and will work vigorously to improve the quality of life in our community for individuals, families and children.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
The nonprofit sector continues to innovate and transform to meet community needs. I would encourage individuals entering the field to consider that changing community conditions takes time, tenacity, innovation and a degree of risk. I’ve seen an increasing number of nonprofits moving toward the integration of business models and social change theories. All of this represents a great opportunity for individuals, organizations and the communities served by nonprofits.

With this in mind, find an organization that fits your passion and has bold community goals. Surround yourself with innovative thinkers and agents of change. Reach for the opportunity that maximizes results for you and the organization. Remember that long-term change will not be achieved overnight — look for an opportunity with longevity.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I can honestly say that I cannot imagine doing something else. We often seek to find that job we can be so passionate about that it does not seem like “work” or a “job.” I am very lucky to be living that today. It’s so rewarding to work with business, nonprofit, faith-based, government, academia and so many other sectors to strengthen the quality of life in our community each and every day. I’ve met so many inspiring individuals whose lives have been touched by Valley of the Sun United Way and our many partners. I am humbled to be serving our community and will continue to do so proudly.

Wall Street Rescue 2010

Wall Street’s Rescue Package Is Changing Tax Laws For Businesses

The recent financial rescue package signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 3 contains not just $700 billion in federal assistance, but also a number of tax measures that are significant for Arizona businesses.

Renewable energy tax incentives
The renewable energy tax incentives extension was widely anticipated by the industry. Many states, including Arizona, are adopting or expanding their renewable energy standards, and these provisions are designed to make the conversion to renewable energy more tax-efficient.

The 30 percent investment tax credit, particularly the eight-year extension of the Section 48 credit for solar energy, is especially important given Arizona’s potential for solar and alternative energy-related businesses. These incentives are expected to not only continue current investment levels, but also to attract new business investment in Arizona’s alternative energy efforts.

It’s key to note that the energy tax incentives apply to businesses that use them — not to solar energy manufacturers. For example, mixed-use developments adding solar panels to parking garages, construction firms building LEED (Leadership in Energy Efficient Design)-certified structures, and retail centers adding solar roof panels will benefit from the incentive.

Another aspect of the energy credit changes is the elimination of the public utility exception. Two years ago, the Arizona Corporation Commission ruled that regulated electric utilities must generate 15 percent of their energy from renewable resources by 2025. However, utilities have been unable to benefit from this incentive. Regulated utilities may now obtain a 30 percent investment tax credit from their investment in qualifying property.

For instance, if APS purchases solar panels and installs them on your property to provide your electricity, APS will be allowed to take the credit. This provision allows public utilities to own and operate solar and other energy tax credit facilities and include them in their rate base for rate-making purposes.

Research and development credit
The bill extends the research and development tax credit through the end of 2009, increases the alternative simplified research credit from 12 percent to 14 percent for the 2009 tax year, and repeals the alternative incremental research credit for the 2009 tax year.

Given the current economic conditions, this retroactive extension potentially creates both cash benefits and earnings-per-share benefits. Businesses will need to consider the financial statement effect of the research credit now available for 2008, as well as the effect of the retroactive extension on their estimated tax payments for the 2008 tax year. Fiscal-year taxpayers who have already filed their 2007 tax year returns should consider filing amended returns to claim research credits for the period for which the credit had expired. In light of increasing IRS scrutiny, consider your approach and your documentation for the research credits you take. This retroactive extension also provides the opportunity to consider a pre-filing agreement with the IRS for the research credit for the 2008 tax year and beyond.

Alternative minimum tax (AMT)
The AMT is a separately computed tax that eliminates many deductions and credits that are allowed in computing regular tax liability for individuals, estates and trusts. In recent years, Congress has repeatedly enacted a temporary “patch” that significantly raised the applicable AMT exemption amounts. The AMT exemption amounts are phased out for higher-income taxpayers.

The AMT patch for 2008, without which more than 20 million taxpayers would have been hit with AMT liability early next year when filing their 2008 returns, was included in the financial rescue legislation. The legislation also increases the AMT refundable credit amount for individuals with long-term unused credits for prior year minimum tax liability, eliminates the income phase-out, and abates any underpayment of tax (including interest) outstanding on Oct. 3 related to AMT that was generated from the exercise of incentive stock options.

Changing tax law, increased IRS audits and the direct negative ramifications that follow from financial statement restatements mean that achieving certainty in tax positions is more important than ever. Many taxpayers are planning upfront and substantiating all their positions. As companies experience flat or negative results, tax considerations become more important to the bottom line. Tax departments are being asked to find efficient ways to maximize cash and strengthen balance sheets. The new legislation can benefit businesses in this challenging time.

Wayne Hoeing is a partner with Ernst & Young LLP in the firm’s Phoenix office.

McCain, America's Next Leader - AZ Business Magazine Oct. 2008

America’s Next Leader

The last time an Arizona politician stood at the threshold of the White House was 44 years ago, when Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater introduced a new form of conservative politics to America before falling under the wheels of President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s campaign juggernaut.

american-next-leader 2008

Now, another Arizonan, also the Republican nominee, has the White House within his grasp.
Within weeks, Sen. John McCain will either make history or repeat it in one of the most closely watched presidential elections in modern history as he squares off against Sen. Barack Obama, the first African-American presidential nominee of either major party.

“I don’t seek the office out of a sense of entitlement. I owe America more than she has ever owed me,” McCain says. “Thirty-five

years ago, I came home from an extended leave abroad. While I was away, I fell in love with my country. I have been an imperfect servant of my country ever since, in uniform and in office, in war and peace.”

That he has made it this far is remarkable considering his campaign seemed on the verge of collapsing in the months before the Iowa caucus.

McCain had trouble getting his primary campaign off the ground. Then, after securing the Republican nomination, McCain’s campaign began to drift, says Larry Sabato, a nationally recognized political science professor at the University of Virginia.

“He was the nominee for the Republican Party long before Obama had the Democratic bid, but he didn’t seem to use that time wisely,” Sabato says.

However, Sabato believes McCain’s campaign has since tightened up considerably.

“They are making decisions quickly and rolling the dice as needed,” he says.

Deeply involved in politics since leaving the U.S. Navy in 1981, McCain was first elected into the U.S. House of Representatives in 1982. He was elected into the U.S. Senate in 1986. When he was reelected for his third Senate term in 2004, McCain won by an overwhelming percentage of the vote.

In between, McCain ran for president for the first time in 2000, hoping to ride his Straight Talk Express campaign bus all the way to the White House. An underdog, he surprised supposed frontrunner Texas Gov. George W. Bush by winning the New Hampshire GOP primary. That’s when the campaign turned ugly, and in the South Carolina primary, very personal. Bush, of course, eventually won the Republican nomination and the general election.

Over the past eight years, McCain has clashed with Bush on numerous issues, but he has remained unwaveringly behind Bush on the Iraq War, telling radio talk show host Mike Gallagher earlier this year, “No one has supported President Bush on Iraq more than I have.”

McCain went on to add, “… there are many national security issues that I have strongly supported the president (on) and steadfastly so.”

Bush in turn has expressed his support for McCain’s 2008 presidential bid, giving his endorsement earlier this year and saying that McCain has the “character, courage and perseverance” to lead the country, according to an article on CNNPolitics.com.

Even Paul Johnson, the former Phoenix mayor who at one time expressed concern about McCain’s famous temper, believes the senator is maintaining a solid campaign.

“I am proud of the way he is running his campaign and the issues he’s bringing to the forefront,” Johnson says.

Besides taking flak for his temper, McCain has also been taken to task for breaking from the Republican Party on some high-profile votes, and even for his age; at 72, he would be the oldest president in U.S. history, if elected. But countering that is the fact McCain is also a respected war hero.

McCain spent five and a half years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War in the infamous camp dubbed the “Hanoi Hilton,” where he was forced into solitary confinement, denied medical treatment and beaten by the North Vietnamese. But he maintains he is not bitter — rather he is humble.

“There is no higher honor than sacrificing for a cause greater than my own self-interest,” he says.

He also believes this experience, as well as his leadership in the Senate Armed Services Committee, makes him the most-qualified candidate to be commander in chief.

McCain’s domestic platform for his potential presidency begins with a goal to present greater opportunity and prosperity for workers and their families.

“That agenda will ensure those workers are employed by businesses that invest in innovative technologies, are not strangled by excessive regulation, are not burdened by high taxes, do not face rising health costs that squeeze wages, and sell more products and services in world markets,” he says.

On the foreign policy front, McCain has made no secret of his support of the war in Iraq, but he admits, “I do not want to keep our troops there a minute longer than necessary to secure our interests. And I believe we can achieve that goal, perhaps sooner than many imagine, and must give Gen. (David) Petraeus and our troops the necessary time to succeed in Iraq.”

He adds that if elected president, he will ensure “al-Qaeda has no safe haven anywhere in the world, including Afghanistan, where U.S. and NATO forces continue to root out and eliminate the threat of remnants of the Taliban and al-Qaeda.”

McCain promises that with him at the helm, American families will be secure from threats domestic and foreign. “I will take on our damaging dependence on imported oil and make sure that oil will never again be a weapon against us,” he says. “America’s workers will be secure in the fact that they have portable health insurance and pension benefits, allowing them to move from job-to-job, job-to-home, and job-to-retirement without fear of losing their financial safety net.

“They will be secure in the knowledge that if the economic foundation of their employer or industry shifts, they will be prepared to make the transition to a new job and have access to community college-based training programs that provide the skills to acquire and hold a better job for the 21st century.”

McCain does not deny that there are major economic challenges that must be confronted and he has plans to amend these crises. “Americans are suffering under high gasoline prices, rising food prices, a housing crisis, and tough credit conditions that threaten even the ability of our students to get their college loans,” he says.

As part of McCain’s approach to ease consumers’ current pain, he pushed for a summer gas tax holiday and to stop filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. He has also proposed his so-called HOME Plan to provide robust, timely and targeted help to those hurt by the housing crisis. In addition, he called for a Justice Department task force to investigate wrongdoing in the mortgage industry.

To ensure that college remains a reality, McCain has proposed a student loan continuity plan that will coordinate policies with the states to keep the credit crunch from hurting students.

McCain also promises to address the challenge of rising health care costs by “transforming the health care system to focus on quality, cost, and being responsive to the needs of American families.” He adds: “Furthermore, I will not leave difficult tasks like securing our border, entitlement reform, or fixing our schools for another generation of leaders to solve.”

McCain has lofty goals for the future and security of America and its people. But he has one major obstacle standing between himself and the White House. In the minds of many Americans, the sheer fact that McCain would be replacing another Republican — and a highly unpopular one at that — is a detriment to his campaign, according to Patrick Kenney, professor and chair of Arizona State University’s political science department.

“The Republicans have been in power since 2001 and ‘peace and prosperity’ is not going well,” Kenney says. “The economy is down, the war is not entirely supported and (McCain) is linked to Bush’s war and economic program.”

For his part, Obama is hoping the link to Bush will work in his favor. He released a television spot in late July titled “The Low Road,” in which, The Huffington Post reports, “the Illinois Democrat (is) playing his trump card: tying McCain to George W. Bush, both in politics and in policy.”

However, Arizona’s other senator, Jon Kyl, believes McCain’s connection to Bush and the war has a positive side. “He was instrumental in helping Bush with the surge strategy after he returned from Iraq and saw first-hand the things that weren’t being done properly to win the war,” Kyl says.
It is this military expertise and experience that Kyl believes will help McCain gain support from veterans.

“I think that all Americans appreciate his service and it will help prepare him to make decisions and winning strategies in the war,” Kyle says. “It helps identify him with leadership, experience, courage and independence.”

cover october 2008

Grant Woods, the former Arizona attorney general from 1991-1999, thinks it is that very independence that makes McCain the ideal man to lead the nation. “He will never be a scripted, always ‘on’ message candidate,” Woods says. “This is frustrating to the professionals, but makes him more attractive to real people because he is a real guy.

“We face great international challenges militarily and economically,” Woods continues. “I believe his lifetime of service gives him the judgment we need to lead the country at this time. He has the experience to make his own decisions.”

As Election Day draws near, Americans will be responsible for making their own decisions, as well. Regardless of the outcome, change is on the horizon — and that is exactly what the American people seem to want for the future.