Tag Archives: retail industry

jda 3D

JDA Software Announces Release of JDA 3D

JDA Software Group, Inc. announced the release of JDA 3D, an integrated category optimization and three dimensional (3D) virtualization solution that provides true consumer-driven collaboration and visibility that is faster, less expensive, more interactive and incorporates the consumer’s point of view. Powered by Red Dot Square, JDA 3D transforms space and floor planning solutions into a smart, interactive photo-realistic world.

When combined with JDA’s industry-leading space and assortment optimization solutions, JDA 3D delivers powerful new collaboration capabilities to support the retailer/manufacturer range finalization process. It drives innovation and creativity in real time, transforming presentation tools into collaboration environments and connecting retailers and manufacturers at the product, shelf, aisle and store.

“JDA 3D represents a paradigm shift for retailers and their suppliers,” said Scott Welty, vice president, retail industry strategy, JDA Software. “With empowered, knowledgeable, and connected consumers driving changes in the market, successful companies must anticipate and exceed consumer expectations and overcome challenges presented by ineffective tools to support collaborative interpretation. JDA 3D supports interactive supplier and retailer collaboration that improves speed to market, increases space productivity, leverages shopper insights to optimize merchandising decisions, and delivers actionable execution while integrating data and visuals in an interactive virtual world.”

“Suppliers, brand manufacturers or distributors now have a much more effective collaboration platform on which they can develop and validate innovative ways to inspire consumer purchases in a retail store,” said Danny Halim, vice president, consumer products industry strategy, JDA Software. “This 3D virtual reality platform can translate promotion and merchandising ideas in the context of the entire store, enabling them to identify opportunities to guide consumers along the path to purchase from the moment they enter the store. This is especially significant for existing JDA customers who can now benefit from the integrated offering of the 3D visualization technology and the category management capabilities that they already have in place from JDA.”

JDA 3D is a plug-in to the existing JDA Category Management suite, integrated with Red Dot Square’s Smart Suite to offer interactive, consumer-driven 3D collaboration to help suppliers, brand manufacturers or distributors achieve the following benefits:

  • Reduce time and costs by eliminating test and mock-up research stores.
  • Increase flexibility through the ability to test multiple scenarios with real-time, collaborative “on the fly” adaptation.
  • Improve speed to market by increasing the immediacy of test results prior to market deployment.
  • Improve confidence with 3D visualizations that bring ideas to life and enable virtual real-life point-of-view interpretations.
  • The flexibility of JDA 3D allows design, store, and marketing concepts to be developed and positioned in different store environments, creating a powerful collaborative tool for retailers and suppliers to co-develop cost effectively. Further cost savings can also be realized through Virtual Merchandising, which removes the need to build ranges on mock fixtures for different store formats and sizes. Shopper data can be easily visualized using JDA 3D to enhance decision making on ranges and layouts.

 

“JDA 3D makes floor plans, merchandise plans and marketing plans come alive in a rich visual world,” said Mark Edwards, chairman and founder, Red Dot Square. “With the data from JDA’s space and category management solutions and the engaging shopper and activation experience from Red Dot Square’s Smart Suite, we’ve created something that is very powerful for the retailer, manufacturer, and shopper together.”

For more information on JDA Software Group, visit JDA’s website at jda.com.

Insic Wall Socket

Green News Roundup- Green And Sustainable Retail Products

Welcome back to our weekly green news roundup. This week we’ve decided to focus on highlighting green products, some are available now and some are still in prototype stage. Either way, they point to an exciting new direction for the retail industry and their involvement with sustainability.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing kasia@azbigmedia.com

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.

Insic Wall Socket is an outlet product created by Designer Muhyeon Kim that lights up and displays how many watts are being used by whatever device is being plugged into it. The idea behind it is that users will see just how much energy their devices are using and will become more aware of unplugging things when not in use to save energy.

Simple Shoes based out of Flagstaff, Ariz. is committed to making sustainable footwear that is vegan and eco-friendly. Products include bamboo, organic cotton, crepe, jute, hemp, cork, water based glues, recycled car tires, and PET recycled plastic. Not only are the shoes sustainable but the entire manufacturing process is as well.

Healthy Baby Happy Earth is a store in Glendale, Ariz. that sells environmentally friendly items for babies including cloth diapers, organic cotton clothing and a food processor that allows parents to make their own baby food. A lot of their products also provide long-term purposes like the cloth diaper which can serve from newborn to potty-training age.

Yumberi Yogurt is serving up frozen treats in Glendale, Ariz. while also supporting a sustainable environment. All of the yogurts at Yumberi are served in biodegradable bowls made from corn oil and plant fibers and the spoons are made from potato skins. The company also supports eco-friendly events such as their monthly contest that asks kids to write a letter explaining what they are doing to help change the world.

Image via Yanko Design

Bob_Moran

CEO Series: Robert F. Moran

Robert F. Moran
President and Chief Executive Officer, PetSmart

How does the pet retail industry differ from the human retail industry?
First of all — passion. I’ve been in retail for 38 years and prior to coming to PetSmart, we use in retailing passion for the customer. But how can you be passionate about a shirt or a suit or a new coat? … I didn’t really discover passion in retailing until I came to PetSmart. … One of the things we focus on is how do we help pet parents help their pets, who have become members of the family, live long, happy and healthy lives? How can you not get behind that? … We’ve converted our environment not into, “How can I help you sir or help you ma’am,” but “Who are you shopping for today? I’m shopping for Buffy. Well, tell me about Buffy.” … All of a sudden you’re getting a life story and the conversation can go in a million different ways. Through that we’ve asked our store associates to be, pet detectives; find out how we can help, either aspirationally or inspirationally, to take care of some unfulfilled need they may have about a pet who has become a member of the family. … The other side of it is that we have enjoyed over the last 10 years within the pet retailing industry a growth of 5 to 6 percent. Probably the only sector in retailing that has been at that level has been electronics. Even in this recession we’re seeing it dip to 3 to 4 percent. So it’s a great growth industry. … This humanization of pets has really created this growth vehicle, not only for our industry, but for our company. We believe this will go on until about 2020. It’s a great industry to be in. I love the passion and it’s a great place to work …

Has the pet retail industry been able to weather this economic downturn better than the traditional retail industry, and why?
I think what has happened in this recession, which is the worst since the 1930s, is very similar to what happened after 9/11. What I mean by that is that people were sticking closer to home — we call it neighborhooding — they took staycations or no vacations at all, they found ways of not spending money but still having a good time. Pets played a role in that. The only way we suffered was in the housing side. What I mean by that is that there is a high correlation between pet acquisition and new houses. When that went into decline over the past two years that affected our industry. We have not been without problems. Within our industry, the hard goods side, the discretionary goods, the extra toy, the extra bed, the extra collar or leash has been deferred. So we had to find new ways to address the customer needs. I think we’ve been able to do that because of the humanization of pets, because of the neighborhooding, pets becoming, let’s call it, an affordable luxury in a roundabout way. … You’ll find ways to feed the dog, you’ll find ways to feed the cat because they’re members of the family. That’s probably why we’ve been more resilient than the human side.

PetSmart had to make some hard decisions last year in terms of the recession. What were those decisions and how have they helped the company?
Business is very dynamic and it’s always about gaining market share during good times and bad. We made a decision in the recession that cash was king; we had to watch our piggy bank, in a sense. What we ended up doing, because customers were not going to shop as much, we slowed down the number of stores, the number of pet hotels we were building. We also put an intense focus on expense management. … The other thing we did is we invested in the customer experience. A lot of companies didn’t do that. We increased payroll, we put an intense focus on customer satisfaction — the relationship with the customer — because we felt if we did that, as we emerged from this, we would be able to gain and pickup market share. … If you really look at other retailers during this time they cut back on payroll, they cut back on 401ks, they cut back on the quality of the associate life — they actually cut back on the customer quality of life inside a store. We didn’t do that at all.

Going forward, what does PetSmart see in terms of growth within its industry in general and what plans does the company have for the future?
We’re blessed to be in a great industry. We’re in an industry that will probably grow 3 to 4 percent. How do we take advantage of that? Not only can we bring in new customers, but we can also gain market share from some of our competitors. I do see that there will probably be a slow recovery. Now it’s anticipated that we won’t see the spending levels approaching the 2007 level until 2013 to 2014. But there will be a gradual recovery. Within there are opportunities to take advantage of. Customers are always looking for new things — innovation, services that in a sense fulfill some of their unfulfilled needs. … you can create points of differentiation. What frustrates me about retailers is that they don’t look at their point of differentiation for their business. They try to do a lot of “me too, me too,” and sometimes you don’t recognize the industry anymore because everybody is trying to do the same thing.

What advice do you have for someone who wants to follow the career path you made?
I have two things. One is don’t actually map out a career path. Seek out the knowledge and experience and the jobs you really need to work on so you can demonstrate accomplishments. If you do that the career path comes to you, especially if you are successful and are willing to make certain sacrifices along the way, it will come to you. My secondpiece of advice is, and it’s going to sound trite, treat your office as a prison and escape it as much as possible, because not everything is happening here. Everything is happening out there. The more you can roam, the more you can find out what’s going on, the more people you get to know. Early in your career you call it networking, but in networking you find opportunities. You can turn some of your knowledge and experience toward those opportunities. As you get older and start getting accomplishments and you get titles along with it, you find what’s going on and where you can prioritize the needs of the company and the resources of the company, and that becomes very important.

Vital Stats

  • Joined PetSmart in 1999 as president of North American stores.
  • Appointed president and chief operating officer of in 2001.
  • Named president and CEO in June 2009.
  • Former president of Toys R Us, Canada.
  • Spent 20 years with Sears, Roebuck and Company.
  • www.petsmart.com

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010